David Bailey / Research

Drawing the research stage of my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project to a remarkable close, the fifth and final photographer I have chosen to research for my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project is David Bailey.

David Bailey is an English Fashion & Portrait photographer, who became a photographic assistant at the John French studio in 1959 and in 1960, David Bailey was a photographer for John Cole’s Studio Five before he was contracted for the iconic and internationally renowned fashion magazine, British VOGUE.

Below are the slides in the exact order, and the work I have done Harvard Referencing for which references David Bailey’s photography work I take absolutely no credit for. I also take absolutely no credit for the self-portrait photograph produced by David Bailey himself. I’ve merely referenced David Bailey’s photography work in my research as inspiration to inform and develop my own photography work and photography skills further as I approach the end of my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project.

The pages that are referenced can be found below, complete with Harvard Referencing, which describes in short detail who David Bailey is, the best photographic pieces of work he has produced, the publications he has released, the exhibitions he has done to showcase his photography work, including the awards he has received, with references and external links to further research. All credit goes to David Bailey.

Now that I have managed to cover all five photographers for the Facial Expressionism Final Major Project I have been working on, David Bailey’s photography work, including Fazal Sheikh, Irving Penn, Thomas Ruff & August Sander‘s work have helped me to develop my headshot photographs better. As I am wrapping up the Facial Expressionism Final Major Project very soon, I can promise there are three more headshot photography articles on the way.

This research presentation on David Bailey can also be found in my E-Folio and the next subject I have photographed, who is the last subject I have photographed for my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project before I submit all of my Final Major Project coursework on Monday 5th June 2017 will also be featured in the E-Folio once they’re published. I can confirm there are three more headshot photographs on the way, so keep your eyes peeled, as these photographs I have taken have shown my improvements in my photography skills, as well as the locations I have shot these photographs whilst in Croydon.

If you found this final research presentation on David Bailey useful, please let me know. I would love to hear your response.

Alex Smithson

August Sander / Research

Continuing on from the first, second and third photographer I have researched for my Final Major Project, the fourth photographer I have chosen to research is August Sander.

August Sander was a German portrait and documentary photographer, and his first book, titled: “Face of Our Time (German for Antlitz der Zeit)”, was published in 1929. He was also described as being “the most important German portrait photographer of the early twentieth century.”

Below are the slides in the exact order, and the work I have done Harvard Referencing for which references August Sander’s photography work I take absolutely no credit for. I also take absolutely no credit for the self-portrait photograph produced by August Sander and used by Widewalls. I’ve merely referenced August Sander’s work in my research as inspiration to inform and develop my own photography work and photography skills further.

The pages that are referenced can be found below, complete with Harvard Referencing, which includes August Sander’s legacy, the posthumous exhibitions done after August Sander passed away on the 20th April 1964, including the publication he released in 1929, titled: “Face of Our Time”, also noting the unreleased book that was left incomplete that detailed his travels, with references and external links to further research. All credit goes to August Sander Stiftung and Widewalls.

The research I’ve done on August Sander will help me to develop my headshot photographs better for my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project. As I’ve mentioned before, I will be photographing some subjects for my Facial Expressionism Project, so you’ll be seeing some new headshot photographs very soon. This research presentation can also be found in my E-Folio and any of the subjects I photograph will also be featured in the E-Folio once the headshot photographs I produce of the subjects I photograph for my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project are published. I can promise there are more headshot photographs on the way, so keep your eyes peeled!

If you found this research presentation on August Sander useful, please let me know. I would love to hear your response.

Alex Smithson

Thomas Ruff / Research

Continuing on from the first and second photographer I have researched for my Final Major Project, the third photographer I have chosen to research is Thomas Ruff.

Thomas Ruff is a German photographer who lives and also works in Düsseldorf in Germany. As he currently shares a photography studio with other German photographers, such as Andreas Gursky, Axel Hütte and Laurenz Berges on Düsseldorf’s Hansaalee, the photography studio itself formerly comprised of a municipal electricity station, which was converted between the course of 1998 and 2000 by architects, Herzog & de Meuron, who are part of Tate Modern fame, with an updated basement gallery that was completed in 2011.

Below are the slides in the exact order, and the work I have done Harvard Referencing for which references Thomas Ruff’s photography work I take absolutely no credit for. I also take absolutely no credit for the self-portrait photograph produced by Hans Peter Schaefer and Thomas Ruff. I’ve merely referenced Thomas Ruff’s work in my research as inspiration to inform and develop my own photography work and photography skills further.

The pages that are referenced can be found below, complete with Harvard Referencing, the awards that recognised Thomas Ruff’s work, as well as the various exhibitions he has done, including his publications and ISBN numbers, and also his major collections, with external links to further research. All credit goes to Thomas Ruff, Tate Modern, Hans Peter Schaefer, Haus Der Kunst & Rubell.

This research I’ve done on Thomas Ruff will help me to develop my headshot photographs better for my Facial Expressionism. As I’ve mentioned before, I will be photographing some subjects for my Facial Expressionism Project, so you’ll be seeing some new headshot photographs very soon. This research presentation can also be found in my E-Folio and any of the subjects I photograph will also be featured in the E-Folio once the headshot photographs I produce of the subjects I photograph for my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project are published. I can promise there are some updated headshots on the way, and one of the subjects I will be photographing soon will be someone who I’ve been working with most recently, so I am absolutely certain that you won’t want to miss the creative photography work I will be publishing very soon.

If you found this research presentation on Thomas Ruff useful, please let me know. I would love to hear your response.

Alex Smithson

Irving Penn / Research

Continuing on from the first photographer I have researched for my Final Major Project, the second photographer I have chosen to research is Irving Penn.

Irving Penn was an American photographer who was best known for his portrait, still life and fashion photography collections, and his photography career consisted of work he produced with the top fashion magazine company, VOGUE, including Clinique and Issey Miyake.

Below are the slides in the exact order, and the work I have done Harvard Referencing for which references Irving Penn’s photography work I take absolutely no credit for. I also take absolutely no credit for the self-portrait photograph produced by Irving Penn himself. I’ve merely referenced Irving Penn’s work in my research as inspiration to inform and develop my own photography work further inspired on Irving Penn’s photography work.

The pages that are referenced can be found below, complete with Harvard Referencing, the award that Irving Penn received for his work, as well as the various exhibitions he did in his life, including the posthumous exhibitions after he passed away that showcased his work, not to mention Irving Penn’s bibliography, which consists of publications and ISBN numbers, and also his major collections, with external links to further research. All credit goes to Irving Penn & The Irving Penn Foundation.

This research will give me the chance to develop my Facial Expressionism Final Major Project better. As I’ve mentioned before, I will be photographing some subjects for my Facial Expressionism Project, so you’ll be seeing some photography work soon. This research presentation can also be found in my E-Folio and any of the subjects I photograph will also be in the E-Folio once the subjects I have photographed are published. There’s a lot of great opportunities in store so I am sure that I will be able to present to you a lot more of my creative photography work.

If you found this research presentation on Irving Penn useful, please let me know. I would love to hear your response.

Alex Smithson

The Barbican Gallery | Tuesday 10th May 2016 | Croydon College

On Tuesday, I travelled with my Film & Photography class up to London on a trip to the Barbican Gallery. Because this is the first time I have ever visited the Barbican Gallery, I was shocked to find how massive it was inside. There is so much information available at hand and whilst I was there, I took photos around certain parts of the Barbican where I was allowed, and I must say I was surprised. Despite the damp and dismal weather we had on Tuesday, this didn’t stop me from getting a collection of photos together.

Below are the collection of photographs I was able to get whilst I was on the trip on Tuesday.

I also did some note-taking whilst I was on the trip, as part of the research I’ve been gathering for my Final Major Project. Below are the notes that I gathered from Tuesday’s trip.

Strange and Familiar – Curated by the Iconic British Photographer, Martin Parr.

International photographers from the 1930s onwards.

Edith Tudor-Hart

  • Family Group, Stepney, London (ca. 1932)
  • Group Reading the Daily Worker, London (ca. 1943)
  • Gee Street, Finsbury, London (ca. 1936 – 1937)
  • Poodle Parlour, London (ca. 1936 – 1937)
  • Kensal House, London (ca. 1938)

Robert Frank

  • City of London (1952)
  • City of London (1951)
  • London (1951)
  • Caerau, Wales (1953)
  • Wales, Ben James (1953)

Paul Strand

  • Mary and John McKinnon, South Uist, Hebrides (1954)

Cas Oorthuys

  • Pupils of an Oxford Girls School (1962)
  • Car Transporter Outside Balliol College, Oxford (1962)
  • Oxford (1962)
  • Hogarth Court, Camden Road, London (1953)
  • Hyde Park, London (1953)
  • Merchant, East London (1953)
  • Arabian Merchant, Petticoat Lane, London (1953)

Bruce Davidson

  • Woman in Wheelchair, Brighton (1965)
  • Hastings, England (1960)
  • Teatime in the Car, Brighton (1960)
  • Couples on Stone Beach, Brighton (1960)
  • Lloyd’s List, London (1960)

Gian Butturini

  • Man Walking Down a Street (1969)
  • Homeless (1969)
  • A Calm Day (1969)

Jim Dow

  • Interior, Bert’s Eel and Pie Shop, Peckham, London (15th July 1985)
  • Window Display at Khatta-Meetha Vegetarian Take-Away, Leicester (21st March 1987)

Bruce Gilden

  • West Bromwich, Debbie (2013)
  • West Bromwich, Andy, from Newcastle, of the Bus Station (2014)
  • Romford, Essex, Sherry (2013)
  • Essex (2013)
  • West Bromwich, Peter at the Bus Station (2014)

Overall, I did enjoy the trip and I would love to go again sometime. It’s massive in the Barbican, so I now know what to expect if I plan on revisiting the Barbican Gallery again in the foreseeable future.

If you enjoyed this article of my trip to the Barbican Gallery, please feel free to submit feedback. All feedback is much appreciated.

Alex Smithson

© Croydon College 2016

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Weekly Log 3 (Tuesday 24th November 2015 – Thursday 26th November 2015) – Ghost Stories

Bringing an end to the Weekly Logs in the Ghost Stories Project, here is the third and final Weekly Log that I produced for the Ghost Stories Project before getting all my work ready over the course of December 2015 to hand in before the Christmas Holidays.

Research / Context

For my research, I looked at the 3 films, which were 2012, The Day After Tomorrow and Skyfall. These three films are what would help me to develop my film experiments in a way where they would connect to the work I would be doing with my group.

To develop my own understanding of the processes or image meaning in particular contexts, I watched the three films mentioned above, as these films would give me an accurate idea as to how I could use my own ideas, and then mix them together with the large variety of ideas that my group also had. These three films helped me to develop my own understanding of these processes, which would, in turn, help me to produce a large amount of footage with my group.

The name of the director who directed The Day After Tomorrow and 2012: Roland Emmerich

The name of the director who directed Skyfall: Sam Mendes

Practical Tasks Done

How did I do it? I did it by shooting some experimental footage with my group, and once we finished filming, the process we used was called a film montage, where we would put together the recorded clips that were made over the course of two or three weeks, and make sure that they piece together to create a montage where an angel would appear over the character that was depressed and on the verge of killing themselves, and to help that person get away from that point by helping them to become stronger rather than weaker.

What was difficult? What I thought was difficult was that because the weather conditions were the main worry, considering that there was rain forecast, I was genuinely worried as to whether it would affect us from being able to film our footage, but luckily, we had just the right amount of weather to shoot our footage for our own film.

What worked well? What I thought worked well was that because of how good the footage was, our footage had a lot of good visual and sensual imagery, given that one of the students was the main director of our film, and he was also playing the part of someone who was depressed (Mason). This meant that because he was both the director and main casting actor in our film, this was good for our footage as he was able to reimagine himself from someone else’s view as if they were having a panic attack or a mental breakdown, considering that he made the concept of our own footage a lot more convincing, and also open in many different aspects.

How could I improve it? I could improve it by making sure that the footage that me and my group recorded is pieced together, but with certain clips ranging from 10-15 seconds, up to 20 seconds at the most, so that my own short film stands at exactly 4 minutes.

Critical Analysis

In terms of composition, that’s regarding the framing, the positioning of objects, the line, the tone, the cut and the pace etc., I did make sure that the footage that we recorded had a lot more emphasis added to it, as me and my group wanted to make sure that our footage was of the right standards to fit our own project description, as our project is based around Ghost Stories. I felt that composition was used very well when it came to producing the footage, as everything in terms of our concept was in the right place, and with all of the footage, this was absolutely perfect, as all the footage is now ready to be put together in Adobe Premiere.

In terms of my research/contextual studies, I feel that I can apply them to help me develop my own experiments, based on the Ghost Stories project, and I feel that I can apply them to develop my own experiments, as I’ll be able to use my knowledge from the research that I’ve gathered and apply them to the concept that me and my group have gone with.

This Ghost Stories Project Log set has officially come to an end. Check back soon for the first Weekly Log from the Stop-Frame Animation Project that I started in January.

Alex Smithson