timetotalk

#TIMETOTALK / Let’s End this Stigma Against Mental Health Once and for All!

As #TIMETOTALK is officially trending on Twitter, Oli Regan has asked me to write this article as today will be about being able to speak up about Mental Health, including the negative stigma that affects and negatively impacts those suffering from Mental Health. Today is Time to Talk Day, and this news came at exactly the right time.

You can catch Oli Regan live on BBC Two at 9:30 AM this morning, and at 10:30 AM, Oli will be appearing on the Victoria Derbyshire Show.

Oli Regan will also be talking about Mental Health at 12:00 PM and 1:00 PM on BBC Newsbeat today, so if you want to help end this stigma once and for all, please make sure to use the hashtag #TIMETOTALK and please also make sure to spread the word and raise awareness for Mental Health.

Alex Smithson

#MENTALHEALTHAWARENESS #TIMETOCHANGE #TIMETOTALK #ENDTHESTIGMA #TIMETOTALKDAY

do-you-think-drones-should-be-used-in-the-public-domain-i-dont-think-so

Do You Think Drones Should Be Used in the Public Domain? I Don’t Think So!

Recently, I watched the feature-length 30th Anniversary Episode of BBC’s Casualty, and as you saw, Connie Beauchamp and Grace Beauchamp were horrifically injured after their car toppled off the edge of a cliff as a result of a dangerous driver.

The reason that drones have come to the surface is because almost an hour into the feature-length episode of Casualty, a boy receives a birthday present from his father, who the mother takes an instant dislike to after she discovers that a birthday gift has been left on her doorstep. This birthday gift later turns out to be a drone, which can be controlled by the use of a controller that allows it to fly to a certain height.

In the face of reality, drones, as you know, are commonly used in the public domain and there have been near misses and fatal accidents as a result, and there’s always been advice that’s been given that you are not allowed to fly your drone to a certain height where it is in restricted airspace, the same of which applies to flying the drone near ground level in front of incoming traffic.

In the episode, the boy operates the drone with the controller, to which at a certain stage following Connie & Grace’s horrific car accident that the drone clips the smaller wings of the helicopter carrying Connie’s daughter, which, in effect, plummets near enough into the hospital, which saw a mass bloodbath take place, with someone even losing the functionality of their foot as a result. This also meant the pilot controlling the helicopter died instantly as a result of the drone clipping the smaller wings of the helicopter.

After the horrific bloodbath occurs as a result of the drone clipping the helicopter, which had also caused parts of the hospital to cave in on itself, with one of the large helicopter wings narrowly just missing Caleb, the boy wonders what has happened after he discovers that the drone his father left on his doorstep isn’t responding to the controller, and then he heads to the hospital, to which he is greeted with the mass bloodbath that the drone caused for everyone else as a result. After he sees the devastation the drone has caused, the new doctor who made her début in the 30th Anniversary episode, who was also found to have been extremely rude to the staff on her first day, spots the boy and sees him panicking, to which she does everything she can to help.

The boy then admits in the heat of the moment that he was the one who operated the drone, which he didn’t know clipped the smaller wings of the helicopter until it was too late. To much of Jacob’s dismay and heartbreak, it becomes clear he wants to subject the boy to a great deal of pain, the same type of pain that Connie & Grace are in, but it’s later realised that it was an accident after the boy reveals he didn’t know it would cause that extent of damage, and he even said himself it was an accident and that he never meant to cause any harm.

Jacob is left broken-hearted after seeing Connie & Grace at their worst as a result of the horrific cliff accident, including Grace’s horrific second accident that occurred as a result of the helicopter that was clipped by the drone, but things turned from bad to worse for Grace, as she suddenly started to fit as a result of asphyxiation while she was in the MRI unit. This, of course, has left Connie herself just as heartbroken as Jacob, as her daughter is in between life and death.

In Holby City, the aftermath of the devastating helicopter crash continued with more drama unfolding, as a patient who was known to have suffered from mental health problems and depression had been found to have been drawing with a pen.

The same patient who suffered from mental health problems and depression then went on to try and attack the patient that knocked Connie & Grace Beauchamp off the cliff, but instead stabbed Alex Walkinshaw‘s character, Adrian Fletcher. As Adrian almost lost his life as a result of the patient stabbing him in the heart, this meant he would be facing difficult hurdles he would eventually overcome. Luckily, as time has passed since the fallout and since Adrian was stabbed, Connie is on the mend, with her daughter Grace only just waking up following the horrific helicopter crash, and Adrian is on the mend as he underwent physio to regain mobility of both of his legs, giving him the ability to walk again following a near-death experience after the stabbing.

But back to the subject, I believe that drones should never be used in the public domain as they pose serious health and safety risks no matter where you are. The dangers of drones and this is where some warnings are ignored:

  • You should never fly a drone within restricted airspace
  • You should never fly a drone near ground level where there’s traffic involved
  • You should never fly a drone unless you have been granted the permission to do so under health and safety regulations
  • You should never fly a drone unless the drone in question is registered for both commercial and civilian use
  • You should never fly a drone around restricted areas where photography and film are restricted.

Drones have been known to have near misses with aircrafts, but with an honest opinion considering I have never owned a drone, nor do I ever dream of owning one, drones should never be used at all in the public domain. They should only be used for governmental use, where they don’t pose a risk to life, though health and safety measures, especially in restricted airspaces should be taken into full consideration. Drones are, in the public domain, legal to use with restrictions in place, but I personally feel they should never be used in the public domain and that they should only be used for governmental use.

Do you own / don’t own a drone? Do you think drones should be / shouldn’t be allowed for use in the public domain? Please let me know by commenting below. All feedback is much appreciated.

Alex Smithson

The Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games - Day #16

Rio 2016: Day #16

As today is the final day of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games, I am really shocked to see how fast the time has flown, it does not feel real.

To think that the Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro started on the 5th August 2016 is an understatement in my opinion, but it just proves that the time sure does fly when you’re having fun.

Over the course of this year’s Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, we have gone from having no medals to 67 medals today, and the 67th and final medal was just won by Team GB‘s Joe Joyce in the men’s super-heavyweight boxing final, with Joe Joyce claiming Silver, with that being our 67th and final medal, finishing Team GB off on a perfectly positive note by coming second on the medal table.

As the Closing Ceremony marks the end of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games from 12:00 AM onwards, it’s safe to say I will miss this year’s Olympic Games, but the good thing I can relive is the memory of going to the London 2012 Summer Paralympic Games whilst the Closing Ceremony is on. Rio de Janeiro’s Closing Ceremony will mark the end of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games, and will be handed over to Tokyo for the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games.

On the bright side, this year’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro have been a lot better and also a much better follow-up from the London 2012 Summer Olympic Games.

You can expect a Closing Ceremony review later as I will be publishing my review of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games as they happen, marking such a perfect end to this year’s Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Anthony Joshua (Olympic Boxing Champion): “It is like you have to knock them out in the heavyweight division. I was praying he caught Yoka with one shot. The power Joe possesses he penetrates the gloves and the body. He is a phenomenal  fighter. To come and collect three medals I am really proud of the guys. It shows the funding is doing well and the more support we get and more medals we produce. They have all done everyone proud.

Sir Matthew Pinsent (Four Time Olympic Rowing Champion): “We expected a party city, that the whole atmosphere would sweep us along. I don’t think that has quite happened in the way we thought it might. The ticket sales have been a huge issue that they haven’t been able to solve.

Victoria Pendleton (Olympic Cycling Gold Medallist): “It took a little while to get going. In the early days we wondered where everyone was. We were lucky in London. Everyone is questioning how this happened but it took ten years to work out how to spend the money until Beijing. There we got a blueprint and brought in experts, incredible people from all over the world to deliver the highest level of expertise.

Anna Thompson (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “It’s the last action of the Rio Games with the men’s gold medal basketball match between USA and Serbia. It all feels very American in Carioca hall 1 with the announcer very much with a USA accent. The US are 33-22 up in the second quarter. The entertainment is certainly cranking up with a disco dance display by the official 2016 mascot and flag cam – lots of USA flags in the crowd but a few others as well including Brazil and Israel. It was a close first quarter but USA are beginning to run away with it here with two three-pointers and a slam dunk from NBA star Kevin Durrant in quick succession.

Sir Steve Redgrave (Five Time Olympic Rowing Champion): “It was fantastic to get more female rowing medallists. They seem to go from strength to strength. We would never repeat 2012 but to come pretty close with three golds and two silvers is pretty incredible. They were very special moments and to be part of it was a privilege. To be able to interview them and speaking to the rowers afterwards. It is certainly a joy.

Team GB’s flag-bearer, Kate Richardson-Walsh: “If it was a movie script I don’t think anyone would believe it, it is a true fairytale. It will be an honour to walk out with the flag, the most amazing finish. They told me this morning and I thought I was in trouble. I thought ‘what had I or the hockey girls done?’ It is an amazing honour to represent all of the wonderful athletes. We have surpassed expectations. This is a wonderful legacy off the back of London. I really hope we have inspired the next generation to take up sports.

Sir Steve Redgrave: “It is so difficult to pick a moment. What is special about the Olympics is the 28 sports coming together. The Brownlees were outstanding but my moment was Maddie Hinch saving the penalty in the first half of the hockey.

Anna Thompson (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “Safe to say the USA are bossing this final, 79-43 up after the third quarter. The crowd are happy and participating in every “cam” going. We’ve had flag cam, kiss cam, bongo cam and muscle cam. Basketball fans sure know how to have a good time at Games!

The United States have won their 306th and final Gold Medal of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games in the Men’s Basketball Final after wiping the floor with Serbia, winning the final with the final finishing score of 96-66. The United States have finished with 45 overall golds in total.

Anna Thompson: “So the USA wrap up men’s basketball  gold – the 15th time they’ve won it out of 19 Olympic finals. That’s the end of the action and what a fantastic Games it has been for the hosts Brazil – recording their most successful Olympics – and Team GB too, who became the fist post host to win more medals than their home Olympics with 67. It’s time for the BBC interactive crew in Rio to sign off after 17 days of action and 306 medal events. It’s been a blast. Obrigada!

Here is the final summary of Day #16 of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games, the final day of this year’s Olympic Games as they unfolded:

  • Team GB’s Joe Joyce won Silver after being beaten by France’s Tony Victor James Yoka for Gold.
  • Team GB have finished with a final overall amount of 67 medals ahead of China in second place on the medal table.
  • The United States have beaten Serbia in the Men’s Basketball Final to win the 306th and final Gold of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games.
  • Brazil’s men have beaten Italy to win Gold in Volleyball, making this Brazil’s seventh Gold of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games.
  • Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge won the Marathon Gold, with Team GB’s Callum Hawkins coming ninth.
  • The Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games Closing Ceremony starts at 12:00 AM, with Rio de Janeiro handing the Olympic Games over to Tokyo for the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games.

Here are the last ever medal table listings for Day #16 of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games:

Country
1

United States
46 37 38 121
2

Great Britain
27 23 17 67
3

China
26 18 26 70
4

Russia
19 18 19 56
5

Germany
17 10 15 42
6

Japan
12 8 21 41
7

France
10 18 14 42
8

South Korea
9 3 9 21
9

Italy
8 12 8 28
10

Australia
8 11 10 29
11

Netherlands
8 7 4 19
12

Hungary
8 3 4 15
13

Brazil
7 6 6 19
14

Spain
7 4 6 17
15

Kenya
6 6 1 13
16

Jamaica
6 3 2 11
17

Croatia
5 3 2 10
18

Cuba
5 2 4 11
19

New Zealand
4 9 5 18
20

Canada
4 3 15 22
21

Uzbekistan
4 2 7 13
22

Kazakhstan
3 5 9 17
23

Colombia
3 2 3 8
24

Switzerland
3 2 2 7
25

Iran
3 1 4 8
26

Greece
3 1 2 6
27

Argentina
3 1 0 4
28

Denmark
2 6 7 15
29

Sweden
2 6 3 11
30

South Africa
2 6 2 10
31

Ukraine
2 5 4 11
32

Serbia
2 4 2 8
33

Poland
2 3 6 11
34

North Korea
2 3 2 7
35

Belgium
2 2 2 6
35

Thailand
2 2 2 6
37

Slovakia
2 2 0 4
38

Georgia
2 1 4 7
39

Azerbaijan
1 7 10 18
40

Belarus
1 4 4 9
41

Turkey
1 3 4 8
42

Armenia
1 3 0 4
43

Czech Republic
1 2 7 10
44

Ethiopia
1 2 5 8
45

Slovenia
1 2 1 4
46

Indonesia
1 2 0 3
47

Romania
1 1 3 5
48

Bahrain
1 1 0 2
48

Vietnam
1 1 0 2
50

Chinese Taipei
1 0 2 3
51

Bahamas
1 0 1 2
51

Côte d’Ivoire
1 0 1 2
51

Independent Olympic Athletes
1 0 1 2
54

Fiji
1 0 0 1
54

Jordan
1 0 0 1
54

Kosovo
1 0 0 1
54

Puerto Rico
1 0 0 1
54

Singapore
1 0 0 1
54

Tajikistan
1 0 0 1
60

Malaysia
0 4 1 5
61

Mexico
0 3 2 5
62

Algeria
0 2 0 2
62

Ireland
0 2 0 2
64

Lithuania
0 1 3 4
65

Bulgaria
0 1 2 3
65

Venezuela
0 1 2 3
67

India
0 1 1 2
67

Mongolia
0 1 1 2
69

Burundi
0 1 0 1
69

Grenada
0 1 0 1
69

Niger
0 1 0 1
69

Philippines
0 1 0 1
69

Qatar
0 1 0 1
74

Norway
0 0 4 4
75

Egypt
0 0 3 3
75

Tunisia
0 0 3 3
77

Israel
0 0 2 2
78

Austria
0 0 1 1
78

Dominican Republic
0 0 1 1
78

Estonia
0 0 1 1
78

Finland
0 0 1 1
78

Morocco
0 0 1 1
78

Moldova
0 0 1 1
78

Nigeria
0 0 1 1
78

Portugal
0 0 1 1
78

Trinidad & Tobago
0 0 1 1
78

United Arab Emirates
0 0 1 1

Afghanistan
0 0 0 0

Albania
0 0 0 0

American Samoa
0 0 0 0

Andorra
0 0 0 0

Angola
0 0 0 0

Antigua & Barbuda
0 0 0 0

Aruba
0 0 0 0

Bangladesh
0 0 0 0

Barbados
0 0 0 0

Belize
0 0 0 0

Benin
0 0 0 0

Bermuda
0 0 0 0

Bhutan
0 0 0 0

Bolivia
0 0 0 0

Bosnia & Herzegovina
0 0 0 0

Botswana
0 0 0 0

British Virgin Islands
0 0 0 0

Brunei
0 0 0 0

Burkina Faso
0 0 0 0

Cambodia
0 0 0 0

Cameroon
0 0 0 0

Cape Verde
0 0 0 0

Cayman Islands
0 0 0 0

Central African Republic
0 0 0 0

Chad
0 0 0 0

Chile
0 0 0 0

Comoros
0 0 0 0

Congo
0 0 0 0

Cook Islands
0 0 0 0

Costa Rica
0 0 0 0

Cyprus
0 0 0 0

Djibouti
0 0 0 0

Dominica
0 0 0 0

DR Congo
0 0 0 0

Ecuador
0 0 0 0

El Salvador
0 0 0 0

Equatorial Guinea
0 0 0 0

Eritrea
0 0 0 0

FYR Macedonia
0 0 0 0

Gabon
0 0 0 0

Gambia
0 0 0 0

Ghana
0 0 0 0

Guam
0 0 0 0

Guatemala
0 0 0 0

Guinea
0 0 0 0

Guinea-Bissau
0 0 0 0

Guyana
0 0 0 0

Haiti
0 0 0 0

Honduras
0 0 0 0

Hong Kong, China
0 0 0 0

Iceland
0 0 0 0

Iraq
0 0 0 0

Kiribati
0 0 0 0

Kyrgyzstan
0 0 0 0

Laos
0 0 0 0

Latvia
0 0 0 0

Lebanon
0 0 0 0

Lesotho
0 0 0 0

Liberia
0 0 0 0

Libya
0 0 0 0

Liechtenstein
0 0 0 0

Luxembourg
0 0 0 0

Madagascar
0 0 0 0

Malawi
0 0 0 0

Maldives
0 0 0 0

Mali
0 0 0 0

Malta
0 0 0 0

Marshall Islands
0 0 0 0

Mauritania
0 0 0 0

Mauritius
0 0 0 0

Micronesia
0 0 0 0

Monaco
0 0 0 0

Montenegro
0 0 0 0

Mozambique
0 0 0 0

Myanmar
0 0 0 0

Namibia
0 0 0 0

Nauru
0 0 0 0

Nepal
0 0 0 0

Nicaragua
0 0 0 0

Oman
0 0 0 0

Pakistan
0 0 0 0

Palau
0 0 0 0

Palestine
0 0 0 0

Panama
0 0 0 0

Papua New Guinea
0 0 0 0

Paraguay
0 0 0 0

Peru
0 0 0 0

Refugee Olympic Athletes
0 0 0 0

Rwanda
0 0 0 0

Saint Kitts & Nevis
0 0 0 0

Saint Lucia
0 0 0 0

Samoa
0 0 0 0

San Marino
0 0 0 0

Sao Tome & Principe
0 0 0 0

Saudi Arabia
0 0 0 0

Senegal
0 0 0 0

Seychelles
0 0 0 0

Sierra Leone
0 0 0 0

Solomon Islands
0 0 0 0

Somalia
0 0 0 0

South Sudan
0 0 0 0

Sri Lanka
0 0 0 0

St Vincent & the Grenadines
0 0 0 0

Sudan
0 0 0 0

Suriname
0 0 0 0

Swaziland
0 0 0 0

Syria
0 0 0 0

Tanzania
0 0 0 0

Timor-Leste
0 0 0 0

Togo
0 0 0 0

Tonga
0 0 0 0

Turkmenistan
0 0 0 0

Tuvalu
0 0 0 0

Uganda
0 0 0 0

Uruguay
0 0 0 0

US Virgin Islands
0 0 0 0

Vanuatu
0 0 0 0

Yemen
0 0 0 0

Zambia
0 0 0 0

Zimbabwe
0 0 0 0

Day #16, the final day of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games has officially come to a perfect close. Check back soon for the Closing Ceremony Review. What a perfect Olympic Games this year’s Summer Olympic Games has been in Rio de Janeiro. We’ve done so much more and excelled much better and I am proud of Team GB. I love you Team GB! Thanks to every single one of you for sticking with me during the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games, but I’ll be back very soon. Stay tuned for the Closing Ceremony Review, you don’t want to miss it!

Alex Smithson

The Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games - Day #15

Rio 2016: Day #15

Kicking off Day #15 of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games, Team GB‘s Nicola Adams won Gold in the Boxing event, bringing our overall medal count for Bronze, Silver & Gold to 63 overall medals, keeping Great Britain in second place (26 Gold, 22 Silver & 15 Bronze).

The United States currently stand in first place with 40 Gold Medals, 36 Silver Medals and 35 Bronze Medals, with an overall count of 111 medals, while China remain in third place with 68 overall medals (24 Gold, 18 Silver & 26 Bronze).

Today has been a great day so far, but it will be interesting to see how things turn out over the course of Day #15 of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

Kevin Kilbane (Former Everton & Sunderland Winger): “We have spoken of revenge. It has been downplayed in the Brazil squad but certainly not the supporters, they do want revenge. What better man than Neymar to open the scoring?

Team GB’s Taekwondo Athlete, Damon Sansum: “We have four athletes here and four possible medals. For such a small taekwondo team we have done amazing. One more fight to go.

Alistair Magowan (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “Talk about picking your moment. Not sure I’ve heard a louder roar at a football match. That was the sound of talisman Neymar scoring at the Maracana in an Olympic final, with Brazil aiming for their first gold medal. Moments come don’t come much bigger and the crowd are showing their appreciation. “Ole, ole, ole, ole, Neymar, Neymar,” they sing in unison. Every single one of them.

Margarita Mamun of Russia has won Gold in the Women’s Individual All-Around Final.

Rob Nothman (BBC Sport): “Joe Choong is struggling in the shooting and this is costing him dear. His medal chances are looking remote.

Rob Nothman: “Joe Choong’s medal chances are over, but let’s put this in perspective – his previous best was seventh in the European championship. He started this event in second.

Alexander Lesun of Russia has won Gold in the Modern Pentathlon event.

Team GB’s Joe Choong, who finished ninth in the modern pentathlon, spoke to BBC Sport: “Everything went really well except for the shooting. I was very happy with my first shoot and the last was the same but the middle I don’t know what happened. There’s been some positives. The girls coming back to finish top 10 and Jamie did well coming back. His swimming was close to his PB, which he hasn’t done for four years.

Jamie Cooke after finishing 13th in the Modern Pentathlon: “Everyone comes here to win medals. That is something I definitely wanted to do but I didn’t put myself in the best position. The fencing killed me but this is my first Olympics, it is inspiring and I want to be back.

Luke Reddy (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “The Olympic Park is largely yellow in colour tonight and there’s a thirst in the air if the queue for beer is anything to go by. Schoolboy error leaving it until half-time. Still, from the beer queue you can watch some questionable dance moves. Olympic mascot Vinicius is going down in my estimations rapidly.

Tim Vickery (BBC Sport South American Football Expert on BBC Radio 5 Live): “A dark look on the face of the Germany coach. He is unhappy his side could not turn their dominance into goals. A gripping first half. More of the same in the second.

Luke Reddy: “If this tournament doesn’t mean much in football terms then this gent missed the brief. He’s having kittens as Brazil defend a free-kick.

Kevin Kilbane (Former Everton & Sunderland Winger): “That is a real quality finish from Max Meyer. Germany continued to pass and probe but I think they were aided by Brazil going on the back foot and allowing pressure to build up on them.

Tim Vickery: “Very impressive from Germany. Meyer is such a busy little figure and that is the first goal Brazil have conceded in the tournament. This will be a real test of the Brazil temperament now. They have not looked anywhere near as good going forward this half. Now they have conceded, let’s see how they react.

Luke Reddy: “They sit and glare like a kid in assembly and screams ring out as Germany level. As it hits the net the screams go silent. A collective swear word doesn’t come but you can sense and feel it, it’s there.

Alistair Magowan (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “When we were speaking to fans outside the Maracana, they were in supremely confident mood. There was talk of 6-0, 7-0, although, admittedly, a fair amount of the local brew had been consumed. No-one really considered Germany having a part to play in the match and now Brazil must recover from conceding their first goal of the Olympics. The crowd responded before pockets of German fans had finished celebrating, and they are jumping up and down now trying to encourage their team forward. Gabriel Barbosa is getting dog’s abuse for not cutting the ball back there as two team-mates closed in on goal. And not just from his fellow players. Half a Maracana stand rises to ask why he didn’t pass, in brutal terms!

Serbia have won Gold in the Men’s Water Polo event.

Alistair Magowan: “Tell you what, when you witness the passion and fervour of the support in the Maracana and the abuse they give the opposition and their own players for making a mistake, it does put the ‘pressure’ that England players supposedly suffer in context.

Kevin Kilbane: “Brazil are coming to life. They are being driven on by the crowd. It is normally in these latter stages of the game, with these tired legs, mistakes will be made.

Tom Daley after his heartbreaking defeat in not making it to the diving final earlier: “I could have won tonight. It is really hard to accept how it went today. When I am up on the board I am complete in the moment but today things were not clicking. I was so up for it but in the competition it fell apart. I am so proud to be part of Team GB, I just wanted to stand on top of that podium but it was not meant to be. Another four years of hard work to try again next time. My mind and body were not connecting. I gave it my all but it did not happen today.

Don’t worry Tom Daley, you’ve done me and Great Britain proud. I am proud and we are proud of you all the way!!!!!!!!!!

Kevin Kilbane: “I think Gabriel Jesus will go on to be an excellent signing for Manchester City. The tempo to this game is relentless. Both sides are trying to force the issue.

Luke Reddy: “I can’t help but think that if the man who made this shirt number famous were here he’d get a better view. Tense at the fan park now. Each time Brazil break forward this lot are trying to suck the ball into the net.

Luke Reddy: “The weird and social Olympics. I’ve just met Tom, a gent from Florida at his 10th Olympics. “Man these people are passionate about their football,” he says.  Tom trades pins, takes in events and mingles. Then I walk about 500 metres and a Brazilian guy stops me asking if I trade pins. I say no and tell him to seek out Tom, showing him an image. “Ah that’s my friend,” he shouts. “Is he here? Where?” They are from different nations and probably separated by about 30 years in age. Still, in some way, the Olympics binds them.

Kevin Kilbane: “I’m not sure how the Brazilian public will deal with a penalty shootout here.

Alistair Magowan: “There is no lack of effort from Neymar or his team-mates, but they are just lacking that killer finish as time appears to slip away. The Maracana is deafening now with the sound of whistles as Germany enjoy a spell of fruitless possession. No-one said I needed ear plugs for this game, but the jeers are intensely loud.

Tim Vickery: “I’m sure you’ve seen the rivalry between Brazil and Argentina at events during this Olympic Games, and how much it takes on a football aspect. In some of the earlier games, Brazil fans have been doing a long count up from one to 23. The reason, is because it’s 23 years since Argentina last won a senior title – the Copa America in 1993. Now – since then, Argentina have won Olympic football gold twice. It is almost a backhanded acceptance from the Brazilian crowd that the Olympic title is not as important as a senior title. However, as a wise man once said, coherence is the last refuge of the unimaginative and no one thinks this is irrelevant now.

Kevin Kilbane: “Brilliantly timed challenge again from the German left-back.

Tim Vickery: “It really is gripping stuff. It’s been so much better than extra time in so many games we see – maybe because there is so much at stake. This stadium is having a collective heart-attack every time the German side attack. They are admirably mature for such a young side.

Kevin Kilbane: “Having been in this position in a major tournament you have got to believe in yourself and in your technique. Weverton goes the right way but it is the power that beats him. It is a poor penalty from Gnabry. He didn’t strike it well and Weverton knows he should have saved it.

Brazil have won Gold in the Men’s Football Final and believe it or not, this is Brazil’s first ever Olympic Gold Medal in Football.

Tom Fordyce (Chief Sports Writer in Rio de Janeiro): “Biggest noise in the athletics stadium all Olympics comes with that news from the Maracana. And it’s still only a sixth full.

Alistair Magowan: “Neymar writes himself into Brazilian history. What a moment. A first Olympic gold medal, a record sixth gold medal at a Games. “The champions are back” screams the Maracana. Total bedlam!

Tim Vickery: “Two years ago the Brazil team were crying before, during and after the game against Germany. They are crying after this game but for very different reasons. They have now completed the set – winning everything they can.

Darren Campbell (Former British Sprinter on BBC Radio 5 Live): “I played football with the locals here one night. They paid for a referee and they had to pay for goalkeepers, because no-one wants to go in goal. That might explain why they don’t produce too many great goalkeepers and we were saying during the game, can’t see Brazil winning this because their keeper won’t save the penalties, but what happened? He saved it!

Paula Radcliffe (Women’s Marathon World Record Holder): “Staying out of danger is the most difficult thing for Mo. He will be right at the back, keeping an eye on the rest of the field before moving forward. Mo’s stride length takes up quite a lot of space and he has to be aware of that because others have to almost step over that back leg, which is what happened when he fell. If we see him in his customary position, at the front of the pack with two laps to go, then I can’t see anyone challenging him.

Denise Lewis (Olympic Heptathlon Gold Medallist): “When you get to that sort of age it is about motivation. To keep putting in the miles, staying meticulous with your diet and routine and I think Mo is an incredible ambassador for our sport.

Aimee Lewis (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “If you thought the Olympic Stadium and the Maracana were where it was all happening – think again. At the taekwondo, Shaggy’s Mr Boombastic is ringing around the arena as we wait for the fighting to begin again. The crowd are loving it, raising their arms, swinging their hips, hoping to get caught on camera. It’s Saturday night, I suppose, the penultimate day, time to party.

Matt Centrowitz has won Gold in the Men’s 1500m final for the United States.

Brendan Foster (Olympic Medallist & BBC Athletics Commentator): “What a great performance from Matt Centrowitz. Everything he did was right but the others, including the Olympic champion Makhloufi, did not run a good race. It almost came down to a 100m race the way they ran it.

Tom Fordyce: “Fabulous from Centrowitz in a classically messy championship final – got his tactics spot on as all others jostled and waited, in the right position when the real race began, with a speed and endurance that belies the injuries he had endured this years. A very popular winner.

Bianca Walkden has won Bronze in the Women’s +67kg event, bringing Team GB’s medal total to 64. We are just one medal away from the London 2012 haul.

Caster Semenya of South Africa has won Gold in the Women’s 800m final with a finishing time of 1:55.28, which is a personal best and also a record for South Africa.

Paula Radcliffe: “That was really quick through 600m but Semenya had enough left to win the title convincingly. Semenya was so strong. I do think she’s capable of breaking the world record. She definitely has it in her.

Tom Fordyce: “The result we all expected, the 1-2-3 many imagined. No world record for Semenya, but you sense it is there when she wants to attack it.

Luke Reddy: “Nipped into the BBC office. You know GB have had a good Games when extra paper has to be added at the bottom.

Maicon Siqueira has won Bronze for Brazil in the Men’s +80kg event.

Paula Radcliffe: “I think the race in London earlier this year was important for Mo because he pretty much ran it on his own. He ran it hard. If there is any criticism of Mo it is that he doesn’t go for the fast times but I think he worked hard at the Anniversary Games and that will give him confidence.

Steve Cram (BBC Athletics Commentator): “It is not about Mo putting his name in the history books tonight, it is about turning another page and writing another story. I’m not sure I have seen Mo this animated in the build up to the race. He was geeing the crowd up.

Brendan Foster (Olympic Medallist & BBC Athletics Commentator): “I am more nervous tonight about Mo running than I have been in any race since 2011. That is partly because he has fallen and was tripped before here. Mo is looking good at the moment, looking strong and running his race sensibly.

Mike Costello (BBC Radio 5 Live Athletics Correspondent): “It is time to dance under the lights again.

Allison Curbishley (BBC Athletics Expert on BBC Radio 5 Live): “I think there’s an Ethiopian plan here. That first lap was quick, well inside 13-minute pace, because they want to make it hard from the start, which is why Mo Farah realised he couldn’t hang around at the back.

Brendan Foster: “This is quite clever. The Ethiopian team has decided they cannot beat Mo in a slow race so let’s make it faster. Six laps to go and they are running at around 13 minute pace. I wonder what the leaders’ tactics are when they get into the late stages? You don’t want to keep leading like this. Mo is letting them know he is there and he is letting them know he is stronger. He moves to the front, relaxes a little and tries to control this race.

Allison Curbishley: “That was an important move from Farah to show he’s feeling fine and is ready. He’s going to try to slow the pace down now from the front. He’s conducting this and they are letting him. Clever.

Brendan Foster: “Mo looks relaxed. Mo looks powerful. Mo looks at his very best. There goes Mo at the bell. He has company…

GOLD!!! Mo Farah has officially won Gold for Team GB in the Men’s 5,000m event.

Steve Cram: “The double double! Four Olympic titles. Four Olympic gold medals. Incredible from Mo Farah. We have never seen anybody who is able to finish like that. Nobody who is able to close a race like that. Nobody who can take all on. It does not matter how quick they are, they cannot take Mo on.

Allison Curbishley: “You can try to knock him down, lead it out hard, but this man is invincible. He had the bit between his teeth. Whatever they had to test him with, he rose to the occasion. What a performance, what a race. Phenomenal.

Tom Fordyce: “Mo Farah is a phenomenon no-one can stop, a tactical and physical master no rivals can crack. As Bolt has owned the sprints, so Farah has ruled the distances.

Brendan Foster: “What a moment. What a fantastic performance. What a privilege to see this man collect a fourth Olympic medal in style. He did it the only way he knows how. Mo, you are a treasure, you are more than a national treasure, you are the greatest we have ever had and one of the greatest distance runners we have ever seen. Mo Farah, for services to athletics deserves to be Sir Mo Farah. He is, for me, the greatest British athlete. Arise, Sir Mo.

Darren Campbell: “All his rivals were laid across the ground and Farah, having done 50 laps of the track this week, was helping them up off the floor. He’s unbelievable! He has such an engine. He just won’t give up. I thought he didn’t have anything left but he did.

Mike Costello: “I thought he had lost this one. For the first time out of all the finals I’ve covered I didn’t think he was going to win. It is astonishing he still had something in reserve. He ran the last of his 50 laps in Rio in 52 seconds. What is going on? That’s incredible.

Paula Radcliffe: “He controls the field to such an extent and I don’t think we will ever see anyone control the field like Mo did.

Ruth Beitia has won Gold in the Women’s High Jump event.

Mike Costello: “I think Mo Farah is the greatest athlete across all sports because of the sheer competitive nature of his events. He’s the greatest British Olympian of all time.

Mo Farah spoke to BBC One after winning Gold in the Men’s 5,000m event: “I can’t believe it. My legs were a bit tired after the 10k – I don’t now how I recovered. People were bringing me food in my hotel room. It shows I didn’t just fluke it in London, to do it again is incredible. I just want to see my kids and hang this medal around their necks. I was surprised by the first lap, I thought it was going to be a slow race. They had a plan, they wanted to take the sting out of me but when I hit the front, I wasn’t letting anyone past me. I hate to lose. Even in PE I hated losing. I have that drive, it is just me. I can’t quite believe it. I wished for just one medal as a junior. It has been a long journey but if you dream of something, have ambitions and are willing to work hard then you can get your dreams. I don’t see my kids, I will never catch that time I missed but if I can achieve something for them, that is what drives me.

Germany’s Thomas Rohler has won Gold with an overall score of 90.30 in the Men’s Javelin Throw Final.

Team GB’s Christine Ohoruogu has won Bronze in the Women’s 4 x 400m relay event.

Allyson Felix of the United States has won the sixth Gold Medal in the Women’s 4 x 400m relay event.

Steve Cram: “They earned it in some style. A very, very good run by the British quartet.

China’s Zheng Shuyin has won Gold in the Women’s +67kg Taekwondo Final after beating Mexico’s Maria Espinoza 5-1.

Denise Lewis (Olympic Heptathlon Gold Medallist): “This GB quartet knew what they had to do. They knew there was a sniff of a medal. They have every confidence in each other. Brilliant job.

Colin Jackson: “So many of those girls have been working hard this winter to try and stay injury free. I was on a train journey with Emily Diamond and we had a long chat about her career and how she is progressing and she had a good solid winter. I am so pleased for the women.

Michael Johnson (Four Time Olympic Gold Medallist in Athletics): “US and Jamaica for the gold I believe and then it will be a battle for bronze.

The United States have won Gold in the Men’s 4 x 400m relay event.

Azerbaijan’s Radik Isaev has won Gold in the Men’s +80kg Taekwondo event.

Andrew Cotter (BBC Athletics Commentator): “That was a great race. The USA did win but not in the manner we expected, we expected them to be much further clear. I felt sorry for Botswana, not getting it quite done in the final leg but they did top load and that is the risk.

Michael Johnson: “This US team I knew would come under threat. It is not a strong team and has not been for sometime. They relied heavily on Merritt but it was great to watch.  A great anchor leg from Jamaica’s Francis, he chased down Botswana. A great competition to end the athletics with.

Confident words from Team GB’s athlete, Andrew Butchart, after he finished fourth in the 5,000m when asked if he had any doubts that Mo Farah would take Gold: “No. I have seen him training. Some of the stuff he does, nobody can do it. End of. He’s such a relaxed guy, you feed off it. It makes you more relaxed. He’s having fun all the time. He’s got one more year then it’s my time.

Eilidh Doyle:We went out and did the same plan we had for the last four years. I wanted to give the girls the best possible start and thankfully I did and they took it on from there.

Anyika Onuora:I just about hung on. I tried to keep my composure the best I could and I am ecstatic to be here with these girls and to be an Olympic medallist. Can you believe? Me, an Olympic medallist!

Emily Diamond: It has been the most amazing experience. We came out here and knew a bronze would be up for grabs and I am so proud we did it.

Christine Ohuruogu after winning her third Olympic medal: “It has been hard but I really want to start enjoying the last 10 years or so of my sport. It is nice to go home with a medal. We have really worked hard because we thought we could medal here. We had to come together as a team today, we had to stick in, stay focused and keep each other’s spirits up. I am so proud of them, we got a good job done today.

Michael Johnson: “It has been a dramatic transformation with GB since 2002. I think the real turning point was Charles van Commenee to be honest. He took a tougher approach and that was needed. What I saw before was being OK with mediocrity and now you see athletes coming off the track saying they want more.

Paul Chelimo was disqualified after the end of the 5,000m race, leaving a Bronze for Bernard Lagat.

On the other hand, Bernard Lagat isn’t so sure: “I didn’t know. I gave all I had. I finished and was still smiling to everybody, saying ‘good job’. I wanted to go to the warm up area and cool down, and see my kids. It is hard to imagine. If you finished fourth and somebody stepped on the line once and got no advantage and you finish fourth, do you really want to say ‘gosh, I won the bronze medal because a guy cheated’. To me, I feel like ‘yes, things happen’. I guess if the rules are like that, whatever decision they want to make tonight I’m going to accept it. Then again if they tell me they gave it me by accident and take it back, no problem.

Paula Radcliffe: “The athletes want to get out there and perform. There is a Mo legacy now. We saw Andy Butchart up in fourth and if you had said four years ago that we would have a British guy in fourth place with Mo still winning it, you would not have thought it possible, but it is because he has seen Mo winning it, he has seen how hard he has worked and said that is what I need to do.

Brendan Foster (Olympic Medallist & BBC Athletics Commentator): “The most exciting thing for me is we have never had a British athlete win four gold medals, we will never see that again. That was one of the greatest moments in British sport. He controlled that race tonight. They all came at him but he just holds them off. His racing brain is fantastic. His competitiveness is something we will never see the like of again. We will never see anyone like him again. I will be very surprised if we see him on the Olympic stage again. I think that was his Olympic farewell. If you keep going and going you will eventually get beaten.

Paula Radcliffe: “Mo does not believe he will be beaten. He sees no reason why he can’t be competitive in every race he competes in.

Denise Lewis: “Over the 5,000 and the 10,000 his rivals cannot do it because that title is taken and it is taken by Mo Farah. The measure of his competitiveness is that at the bell he refused to relinquish the position he wanted. It has been a privilege to see how he has progressed from that junior athlete who did not quite make it but the decisions he has made over the last few years, to move to America and do what is needed to achieve success. Absolutely committed.

Paul Chelimo, who was initially disqualified at the end of the Men’s 5,000m event, has officially been reinstated and has won Silver.

Michael Johnson: “Mo Farah has sought out the best he could find to reach his potential. Everyone knew that potential was there. It will have been a difficult decision to leave his coach and go to something different but that is what was needed to achieve his potential. Everyone works hard, but it is also about working smart – finding the things that will really make those marginal gains. Assessing and diagnosing what areas can improve. What else makes Mo special is his race intelligence and ability to show up on the day and deliver the performance he is capable of. He has done that time and time again.

South Africa’s Caster Semenya after winning the Olympic Gold in the 800m event: “It was hard work. After the Olympics I went home, dislocated my knee and was disappointed but I was just patient, worked on my strength and I am happy. Last year at the world championships it was not really a plan to win but prepare for future championships. I was not in a good shape. I am quite happy with how I am doing, the chemistry with the coach and the team is fantastic. Every athletes dream is to win a medal, especially in the Olympics. I will just have to go back home and see what the future has for me.

Denise Lewis: “I think it should never have come into the public domain. It should have been handled behind closed doors and worked with the powers that be. It is not fair for Caster and not fair for the girls because it allows them to have those sort of reactions because it is in the public domain.

Lynsey Sharp, who finished sixth in the Women’s 800m event: “I feel a bit disappointed. I had a lot left at the end but I don’t know if that means I ran it right or had too much left. I came through strong at the end, that was good, but we shall see.

Lynsey Sharp on Caster Semenya’s dominance: “I have tried to avoid the issue all year. You can see how emotional it all was. We know how each other feels. It is out of our control and how much we rely on people at the top sorting it out. The public can see how difficult it is with the change of rule but all we can do is give it our best. I was coming down the home straight, we were not far away and you can see how close it is. That is encouraging. We will work hard and aim to come back even stronger.

Here are the final medal table listings for Day #15:

Country
1

United States
43 37 36 116
2

Great Britain
27 22 17 66
3

China
26 18 26 70
4

Russia
17 17 19 53
5

Germany
17 10 14 41
6

Japan
12 8 21 41
7

France
9 17 14 40
8

South Korea
9 3 9 21
9

Australia
8 11 10 29
10

Italy
8 11 7 26
11

Netherlands
8 6 4 18
12

Hungary
8 3 4 15
13

Spain
7 3 4 14
14

Brazil
6 6 6 18
15

Jamaica
6 3 2 11
16

Kenya
5 6 1 12
17

Croatia
5 3 2 10
18

Cuba
5 2 4 11
19

New Zealand
4 9 5 18
20

Canada
4 3 15 22
21

Kazakhstan
3 5 9 17
22

Colombia
3 2 3 8
23

Iran
3 1 4 8
24

Greece
3 1 2 6
25

Argentina
3 1 0 4
26

Sweden
2 6 3 11
27

South Africa
2 6 2 10
28

Ukraine
2 5 4 11
29

Poland
2 3 6 11
30

North Korea
2 3 2 7
30

Serbia
2 3 2 7
32

Uzbekistan
2 2 5 9
33

Belgium
2 2 2 6
33

Switzerland
2 2 2 6
33

Thailand
2 2 2 6
36

Slovakia
2 2 0 4
37

Georgia
2 1 4 7
38

Denmark
1 6 7 14
39

Azerbaijan
1 4 10 15
40

Belarus
1 4 4 9
41

Turkey
1 3 4 8
42

Armenia
1 3 0 4
43

Slovenia
1 2 1 4
44

Indonesia
1 2 0 3
45

Czech Republic
1 1 7 9
46

Ethiopia
1 1 5 7
47

Romania
1 1 2 4
48

Bahrain
1 1 0 2
48

Vietnam
1 1 0 2
50

Chinese Taipei
1 0 2 3
51

Bahamas
1 0 1 2
51

Côte d’Ivoire
1 0 1 2
51

Independent Olympic Athletes
1 0 1 2
54

Fiji
1 0 0 1
54

Jordan
1 0 0 1
54

Kosovo
1 0 0 1
54

Puerto Rico
1 0 0 1
54

Singapore
1 0 0 1
54

Tajikistan
1 0 0 1
60

Malaysia
0 4 1 5
61

Mexico
0 3 2 5
62

Algeria
0 2 0 2
62

Ireland
0 2 0 2
64

Lithuania
0 1 3 4
65

Venezuela
0 1 2 3
66

Bulgaria
0 1 1 2
66

India
0 1 1 2
66

Mongolia
0 1 1 2
69

Burundi
0 1 0 1
69

Grenada
0 1 0 1
69

Niger
0 1 0 1
69

Philippines
0 1 0 1
69

Qatar
0 1 0 1
74

Norway
0 0 4 4
75

Egypt
0 0 3 3
75

Tunisia
0 0 3 3
77

Israel
0 0 2 2
78

Austria
0 0 1 1
78

Dominican Republic
0 0 1 1
78

Estonia
0 0 1 1
78

Finland
0 0 1 1
78

Morocco
0 0 1 1
78

Moldova
0 0 1 1
78

Nigeria
0 0 1 1
78

Portugal
0 0 1 1
78

Trinidad & Tobago
0 0 1 1
78

United Arab Emirates
0 0 1 1

Afghanistan
0 0 0 0

Albania
0 0 0 0

American Samoa
0 0 0 0

Andorra
0 0 0 0

Angola
0 0 0 0

Antigua & Barbuda
0 0 0 0

Aruba
0 0 0 0

Bangladesh
0 0 0 0

Barbados
0 0 0 0

Belize
0 0 0 0

Benin
0 0 0 0

Bermuda
0 0 0 0

Bhutan
0 0 0 0

Bolivia
0 0 0 0

Bosnia & Herzegovina
0 0 0 0

Botswana
0 0 0 0

British Virgin Islands
0 0 0 0

Brunei
0 0 0 0

Burkina Faso
0 0 0 0

Cambodia
0 0 0 0

Cameroon
0 0 0 0

Cape Verde
0 0 0 0

Cayman Islands
0 0 0 0

Central African Republic
0 0 0 0

Chad
0 0 0 0

Chile
0 0 0 0

Comoros
0 0 0 0

Congo
0 0 0 0

Cook Islands
0 0 0 0

Costa Rica
0 0 0 0

Cyprus
0 0 0 0

Djibouti
0 0 0 0

Dominica
0 0 0 0

DR Congo
0 0 0 0

Ecuador
0 0 0 0

El Salvador
0 0 0 0

Equatorial Guinea
0 0 0 0

Eritrea
0 0 0 0

FYR Macedonia
0 0 0 0

Gabon
0 0 0 0

Gambia
0 0 0 0

Ghana
0 0 0 0

Guam
0 0 0 0

Guatemala
0 0 0 0

Guinea
0 0 0 0

Guinea-Bissau
0 0 0 0

Guyana
0 0 0 0

Haiti
0 0 0 0

Honduras
0 0 0 0

Hong Kong, China
0 0 0 0

Iceland
0 0 0 0

Iraq
0 0 0 0

Kiribati
0 0 0 0

Kyrgyzstan
0 0 0 0

Laos
0 0 0 0

Latvia
0 0 0 0

Lebanon
0 0 0 0

Lesotho
0 0 0 0

Liberia
0 0 0 0

Libya
0 0 0 0

Liechtenstein
0 0 0 0

Luxembourg
0 0 0 0

Madagascar
0 0 0 0

Malawi
0 0 0 0

Maldives
0 0 0 0

Mali
0 0 0 0

Malta
0 0 0 0

Marshall Islands
0 0 0 0

Mauritania
0 0 0 0

Mauritius
0 0 0 0

Micronesia
0 0 0 0

Monaco
0 0 0 0

Montenegro
0 0 0 0

Mozambique
0 0 0 0

Myanmar
0 0 0 0

Namibia
0 0 0 0

Nauru
0 0 0 0

Nepal
0 0 0 0

Nicaragua
0 0 0 0

Oman
0 0 0 0

Pakistan
0 0 0 0

Palau
0 0 0 0

Palestine
0 0 0 0

Panama
0 0 0 0

Papua New Guinea
0 0 0 0

Paraguay
0 0 0 0

Peru
0 0 0 0

Refugee Olympic Athletes
0 0 0 0

Rwanda
0 0 0 0

Saint Kitts & Nevis
0 0 0 0

Saint Lucia
0 0 0 0

Samoa
0 0 0 0

San Marino
0 0 0 0

Sao Tome & Principe
0 0 0 0

Saudi Arabia
0 0 0 0

Senegal
0 0 0 0

Seychelles
0 0 0 0

Sierra Leone
0 0 0 0

Solomon Islands
0 0 0 0

Somalia
0 0 0 0

South Sudan
0 0 0 0

Sri Lanka
0 0 0 0

St Vincent & the Grenadines
0 0 0 0

Sudan
0 0 0 0

Suriname
0 0 0 0

Swaziland
0 0 0 0

Syria
0 0 0 0

Tanzania
0 0 0 0

Timor-Leste
0 0 0 0

Togo
0 0 0 0

Tonga
0 0 0 0

Turkmenistan
0 0 0 0

Tuvalu
0 0 0 0

Uganda
0 0 0 0

Uruguay
0 0 0 0

US Virgin Islands
0 0 0 0

Vanuatu
0 0 0 0

Yemen
0 0 0 0

Zambia
0 0 0 0

Zimbabwe
0 0 0 0

Day #15’s events have officially come to a close. Please make sure to check back soon for Day #16, the final day of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games. Thanks to all of you for such a fantastic fifteenth day and I hope and wish all of you a very good night.

Alex Smithson

The Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games - Day #12

Rio 2016: Day #12

Opening Day #12, Team GB‘s Mo Farah has made it through to the final of the 5,000m event. In the Sailing event, Clark and Mills’ bid to seal the women’ 470 gold has been delayed. Team GB’s Hull is in contention in the women’s tournament, while Brazil’s Neymar has scored, ultimately helping Brazil to reach the final.

So far, Day #12’s events have been really good and we currently stand in second place on the medal table with an overall 50 medals, while the United States currently have 86 medals. China are in third place with 52 medals. The United States have 28 Gold Medals, 30 Silver Medals and 28 Bronze Medals. Team GB have 19 Gold Medals, 19 Silver Medals and 12 Gold Medals, while China have 17 Gold Medals, 15 Silver Medals and 20 Bronze Medals.

Overall, Day #12 of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games has been really good so far. It will be interesting to see how Day #12 ends where today’s events are concerned.

Mel Clewlow (Ex-Team GB Hockey Player): “There is no reason for GB to do anything other than the simple game. They do all the strength and conditioning and running work for moments like this.

Mel Clewlow: “With GB currently two players down, they really are going to have to try and keep the ball and play simple.

Mel Clewlow: “You can’t help but feel this is the opportunity for the Black Sticks. If they are going to get back into this game it will be while the GB squad is down two players.”

Mel Clewlow: “Merry has all the time in the world to take a touch. There was no need for her to have a swing with her back to goal.”

The Olympic Hockey Gold Medallist, David Faulkner, on BBC Radio 5 Live: “GB rode that quarter – they lost two players through injury. I am disappointed by how New Zealand are playing, but that might be down to GB stopping them playing.

Simon Mason (Ex-Team GB Olympic Hockey Player): “You look how deep GB are being forced by NZ. The Black Sticks are drawing GB side to side. You would normally change players every six or seven minutes because of the intensity, take two players out it has an impact on this physicality. As this goes on it depends if GB are going to be able to maintain that physicality.

Luke Reddy (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “To the right New Zealand fans. “Ole, ole, ole, ole, Kiwis, Kiwis” To the left Great Britain fans. “Let’s go GB let’s go.”Cracking vibe here and it all wraps around a tense atmosphere brought about by how close this is. Great Britain dug in late in that third quarter, I saw Laura Unsworth taking gulps of air. These women are running hard, giving it everything.

Mel Clewlow: “Brilliant from Richardson-Walsh. I am hoping this is cramp and nothing else.

Mel Clewlow: “Even at 2-0 the girls know they have a big 11 minutes to go.

Sara Orchard (BBC Radio 5 Live Hockey Commentator): “There’s more drama in this hockey match than in an EastEnders Christmas special!

Sara Orchard: “Amazing scenes here. That is quite the lead and New Zealand will have to do something extra special to dig themselves out of this hole.

Mel Clewlow: “You can see the hunger in the Great Britain eyes. They can sense there are more goals in this match.

David Faulkner: “New Zealand look like a shadow of the team we have seen in this tournament but full credit to the GB girls. They have taken this game by the scruff of the neck and really imposed themselves on New Zealand.

Mel Clewlow: “It has been a terrific fourth quarter for Britain.

Luke Reddy: “Sam Quek’s boyfriend is going to need a darkened room after this display. He has led the chorus and when those penalties were converted, those around him lost their minds. What a superb display. Team GB have scored, sat and soaked up and then hurt their opponents on the break late on. As has been the case throughout this tournament, from the crowd to each and every player they have given it everything. Medals. We are chasing medals.

Luke Reddy: ““GB’s on fire, New Zealand are terrified.” Or “It’s coming home, it’s coming home, it’s coming, hockey’s coming home.” Which do you prefer? Both are on offer.

Mel Clewlow: “Every time Britain get the ball they are just going to play for territory. Three goals in two minutes is a big ask for New Zealand.

Team GB’s Women won the semi-final in hockey. Team GB’s women will play for gold tomorrow.

Mel Clewlow: “It has been outstanding throughout the tournament from Great Britain. They are the only team who are seven wins from seven and the dream is to be eight from eight.

Mel Clewlow: “Incredible. I am so pleased and proud of everyone out there. It has got me.

David Faulkner: “I am speechless. You could see the sense of realisation on the girls’ faces. Olympic finals do not come along like buses. They have earned their place in the final and everyone in the country should be proud of what they have done.

Simon Mason: “There are times when words can’t describe the emotion. They were magnificent. It wasn’t pretty at times but GB rode it and made it look easy in defence. They countered with authority. It is momentous, monumental.

Simon Mason: “It is about a 31 person group. They have developed a gold medal mentality. Every breath they have taken is about the next game. They want nothing other than to take home gold. It has been incredible to watch.

Simon Mason: “This changes the face of hockey, genuinely. You can talk the right things but these girls have delivered. To come on the Olympic stage and turn it on the way they have, with injuries, the strength, resilience, athleticism, maturity through this squad has been a delight to watch.

Team GB’s head coach, Danny Kerry: “What can I say? Seven games out of seven, not too shabby. The girls executed the game plan superbly today. I am very, very proud of them all.

Team GB’s Captain, Kate Richardson Walsh: “I am exhausted to be honest. I am really proud. We stuck to task and have done our job. We were so resilient. We had to defend like our lives depend on it at times. I’m proud of all the players. What you saw today was the ultimate squad performance. Everyone to a woman did their job and stood up today.

Team GB’s Goalscorer, Helen Richardson-Walsh: “We didn’t feel nervous, we were confident. They got chances but were never scoring and we were thinking that it was going to be our night. We were able to get a stroke and able to score this time.

Luke Reddy: “From missing the opening ceremony for fear of standing up too long to imposing their own social media ban for the Games, this Great Britain side are focused to the core. That was evident as they soaked up pressure and took their chances expertly against a side higher in the global rankings. If rigid focus isn’t enough to win gold, consider momentum. Along with a 100% record on the field, off the field Team GB’s army of friends and family get louder and louder. You get the sense something special is happening. Team GB were flawless against New Zealand. Netherlands are the side everyone feared. Hitting an even higher level will be a necessity.

Japan’s Kaori Icho has won Gold in the Women’s Freestyle Wrestling Event.

Tom Fordyce (Chief Sports Writer in Rio de Janeiro): “Hot and humid in the Estadio Olimpico, a big yellow moon overhead, smoky with the occasional drifting cloud. A skinny crowd thus far despite the presence later on, in the 200m semis, of The Bolter himself. Let’s give it time.

Japan’s Sara Dosho has won Gold in the Women’s -69kg Freestyle Wrestling Event.

Steve Cram (BBC Athletics Commentator): “Kenya’s Ezekiel Kemboi has been disqualified from the men’s steeplechase for putting one foot off the track during the race earlier today. He had won bronze, but they now is awarded to Mahiedine Mekhissi of France. We are astonished at that decision, given the fact that Ezekiel Kemboi was so far ahead. It is one foot and that means he is now disqualified – it is a pretty harsh decision.

Tom Fordyce: “Tiffany Porter distraught with that performance. She is sitting alone on the steps to the interview zone, spikes off, head hung low, berating herself for what she feels she failed to do.

Denise Lewis (Olympic Heptathlon Gold Medallist): “It hasn’t been a vintage year for Tiffany, but I still would have expected her to get through. She will be bitterly, bitterly disappointed with that performance. It is just the way hurdles goes sometimes.

Colin Jackson (Two Time World 110m Hurdles Champion): “Jasmine Camacho-Quinn was rolling, but she is devastated. She catches the trail leg and then it’s all over. Once you have all your force going that way there is not much you can do. Devastated for her.

Steve Cram: “Jasmine was pushing all the way there, maybe that is why she hit the hurdle. She is 19, she’ll have more opportunities but she was right there in amongst it.

Steve Cram: “Tiffany is through to the final and so is her sister. All is well and right in the world.

Darren Campbell (Former British Sprinter on BBC Radio 5 Live): “Tiffany said that she wanted her sister to finish in the top two and nobody else to go faster… she got her wish. From what we’ve witnessed tonight there are medals out there because people are feeling the pressure, they’re hitting hurdles and destroying their chances.

Cindy Ofili after qualifying for the Women’s 100m Hurdles final: “It happened so fast. I didn’t have the best of starts but I am excited for the final. It is amazing that Tiffany is also through with me, I can’t put it into words.

Michael Johnson (Four Time Olympic Gold Medallist in Athletics): “Jazmin Sawyers looks like a gymnast, she is short and has the broad shoulders. Hopefully she can pull it out today and do something good.

Tom Fordyce: “The entire Russian athletics team is now in action on the far side of the stadium. That’s right – Darya Klishina, controversial long-jumper, the sole representative of the once-great track and field powerhouse given clearance – albeit late and belatedly – at these Rio Olympics.

Colin Jackson: “I’m going for Elaine Thompson to take the gold medal, second Tori Bowie, then a certain Flying Dutchwoman to take bronze. That’s Dafne Schippers, by the way…

Michael Johnson: “I think so. I am not sure why that might be in the distance races but the quickness of the track causes all sorts of problems for hurdlers. That could be what’s going on.

Tom Fordyce: “Atmosphere building through the 200m semi-finals. Usain Bolt in the second of the three, off at 0208 BST.

Colin Jackson: “Danny Talbot is in that third position, a great run from him. He did what was necessary. He challenged Christophe, worked hard around the turn and was not intimidated by anyone.

Steve Cram: “Woooah, Christophe, where did you get that from? Really, really good from the Frenchman. A big run.

Darren Campbell: “Danny Talbot had a fantastic start and was probably just slightly ahead of LaShawn Merritt as they came off the bend, but Merritt used that 400m and Lemaitre was really travelling. But all you can do is perform at your best, Danny came third, he’s in the fastest qualifier position, people can get tight and tense, this is the Olympic Games.

Danny Talbot: “Just like last year going to Beijing I ran a PB. Hopefully it will be enough to get into the final, but we will have to see. To be honest I think I had a really good start but then almost relaxed too much round the bend. I was too cautious and maybe should have gone harder. Every athlete thinks they have more in the locker, hopefully that is true for me.

Michael Johnson: “We have seen it where Usain Bolt has been a little more serious. I was wondering how his approach would be to this, he wasn’t too thrilled with that 100m time so maybe he has taken a different approach to this one.

Colin Jackson: “So close to that magical 20 second mark so Adam Gemili has an excellent chance of holding on.

Darren Campbell: “Usain Bolt really played with the field. As he entered the straight he opened up his stride and maybe got up to about gear three.

Tom Fordyce: “Adam Gemili shaking his head after that, but with 20.08 secs behind the blistering Bolt he may still make it through. Fighting it hard through the last 30m as the pressure came on, perversely making running fast that much harder.

Michael Johnson: “Adam Gemili got really tight at the end, the shoulders up high and that makes it really tough. An interesting run by Usain Bolt, he got out fast and quick and let off a bit. De Grasse decided he was going to have a bit of fun and go and get him.

Adam Gemili: “I hope I am through. I am disappointed with that run. It is a good time, but I know I am better than that. I did not run my own race but 20.08 might make the final and if it is I’ll get it right tomorrow. I gave it my best shot.

Darren Campbell: “I don’t think Usain realised that De Grasse was there until the last moment, so that finger shake was like “na, na, na, na, not today.

Usain Bolt: “Andre was supposed to slow down! He didn’t. I said what are you doing it is the semis?! He said he had to push me, so whatever. I was a bit lazy, I don’t know why today, but I executed it. I was watching the 100m and when I crossed the line Steve Cram said I am immortal now. I love that.

Colin Jackson: “It was an exciting semi-final wasn’t it? That is what we like to see. A race with big names, competitive and someone you might not expect just sneaks through. Justin Gatlin was working hard and tried to stick with him. Yohan Blake also struggling. Wow.

Darren Campbell: “Well, well ,well, who would have thought that? But you know what, at the age of 34 the hands of time pass over you and the strength and performances that you had pass over you. I think we’ve seen the start of that today.

Tom Fordyce: “So both Gatlin and Blake out. And Brittney Reese, red-hot favourite for long jump gold, looking like she will have to settle for silver too. A night of shocks in this sticky stadium.

Michael Johnson: “Gatlin made a bit of a mistake. He relaxed. He didn’t realise the others were upon him and then he tried to get back into it but you can’t do that with the class of this field. That was a huge mistake and he will know it. A very strange race. Yohan Blake had so much time off and is not able to run under 20 seconds and probably ran far too fast for the type of shape and condition he is in. He hasn’t had the training yet that can sustain that type of speed.

Usain Bolt has won his second 200m semi.

China have won Gold in the Men’s Table Tennis Team final.

Tianna Bartoletta of the United States has won Gold in the Women’s Long Jump event, with a finishing jump of 7.17m.

Michael Johnson: “Dafne Schippers has been very consistent this year. She has not run as fast as she did last year but this is what she has been targeting, no doubt about that. It is going to be a tough race, very tight. Dafne will probably not be leading at the beginning but she can do the Usain Bolt type of thing towards the end. He really starts to come through and she can do that over 200m.

Michael Johnson: “Schippers is the class of the field and Dina is going to have to run that personal best that she got last year of 22:07 to even get close.

Alistair Magowan (BBC Sport in Rio de Janeiro): “The empty seats inside the stadium are probably explained by the large queues outside, with people deciding to arrive midway through the bronze medal match, saving themselves for the main event ahead which starts at midnight, local time. Having been to a couple of beach volleyball matches already, the atmosphere resembles an outdoor nightclub and Brazilians know how to get behind their team. And it takes a serious amount of energy.

Denise Lewis (Olympic Heptathlon Gold Medallist): “It is a big, big night for Dafne and Holland. They will have stayed up to watch this because she is the poster girl and they believe she has a realistic chance of a title here. She is ready and I really do think she will be tough to beat.

Elaine Thompson has won Gold in the Women’s 200m event.

Colin Jackson: “It was a great race. It was exactly what you want an Olympic final to be. Look at Elaine Thompson, still on the floor. I guess it is all still sinking in – she is now a double Olympic champion.

Tom Fordyce: “Fabulous fifth from Dina Asher-Smith, 20 years old and in her first Olympic final. Schippers devastated in defeat, lying spreadeagled on the track.

Michael Johnson: “Elaine Thompson never focused on the competition, just her own race. Very efficient but ultimately there was never ever any competition for Elaine. Dina ran very well knowing she would not be able to compete with the medallists, she just ran her race. She was running for time and she just let the race come to her. I am very impressed with that. It was a good race by her and will certainly give her confidence for the future.

Justin Gatlin and Yohan Blake have failed to make the Men’s 200m final.

Dina Asher-Smith: “I am really happy, especially after a shaky qualification. I think I still could have done a bit better but I can’t be disappointed with that. It is a learning curve and hopefully I’ll have more world championships and Olympics to get it right. I am just happy to be here, healthy and running close to my PB.

Colin Jackson: “Cindy and Tiffany just need to run their own race and keep calm. Something will happen so if they can keep calm and in the frame, you never know what could happen.

Brianna Rollins of the United States has won Gold in the Women’s 100m Hurdles event with a finishing time of 12.48, while Nia Ali comes second with a finishing time of 12.59 and Kristi Castlin coming third in 12.61 seconds.

Colin Jackson: “The reaction here in the commentary box was very different to that on the track when the result came through. A great result for the Americans, they were very dominant. A great race by Cindy, to be the first of the Europeans is very good indeed. It was a proper battle.

Double Olympic Champion, Elaine Thompson: “It is very special and welcoming feel for me. Watching Veronica Campbell Brown, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and then putting my name there is an amazing feeling. I think my light has shined.

Alistair Magowan: “The United States pair of Kerri-Walsh Jennings (six foot of sunshine) and April ‘the boss’ Ross might have lost their semi-final to Brazilian duo Agatha Bednarczuk and Barbara Seixes de Freites, and be trailing here after the first set, but they’ve just pulled back the second against Larissa Franca and Talita Rocha here to make it 1-1. That was Walsh-Jennings’ first ever Olympic defeat to miss out on a fourth consecutive gold so, in front of a partisan crowd, she ain’t going down without a fight.

Cindy Ofili after coming fourth: “I came out here to try and get a medal for GB. It was a great race. I can only be happy with this performance. I have had an off-and-on year so I am just happy to almost get a medal.

Tiffany Porter after coming seventh: “I did my best. It has been a very difficult year for me but to be honest I am very proud of myself and tremendously proud of my sister. I want to see myself succeed but I want to see my sister succeed as well.

Michael Johnson: “The US is so strong at women’s 100m hurdles and has been for a number of years. It was great to see them come through.

Alistair Magowan: “Kerri-Walsh Jennings adds a bronze medal to her three golds and has still only lost one match at the Olympics as the 38-year old and partner April Ross dominate the third set to win 2-1. The pockets of US fans come alive in a heavily Brazilian crowd, and Walsh-Jennings high fives everyone within touching distance. Brazil still have their final against German pair Laura Ludwig and Kira Walkenhorst to come. Can they win gold for the first time since 1996?

Usain Bolt is aiming to go for the 200m record in tonight’s final, he said: “I definitely think I can try for the world record, I definitely feel that. I need to run efficiently and get into the straight and run the perfect race. If I can run a little more efficiently on the turns. I will be hoping for lane six or seven maybe to be able to run as smooth as I can.

Denise Lewis: “I think Justin Gatlin did not pay enough respect to the other guys in the field. We have seen him blast out of the blocks and he didn’t do that.

Michael Johnson: “Will we see Justin Gatlin at another championship? I think we will see him in London next year.

Jazmin Sawyer’s, who finished eighth in the Long Jump Final: “I am disappointed. I usually thrive in these environments but it did not happen tonight. It was a solid performance but I feel I am capable of more than that. I am a bit gutted but really proud of myself. I have years, I am 22. I don’t feel this is the end for me.

Here are the final medal table listings for Day #12:

Country
1

United States
30 32 31 93
2

Great Britain
19 19 12 50
3

China
19 15 20 54
4

Russia
12 14 15 41
5

Germany
12 8 9 29
6

Japan
10 5 18 33
7

France
8 11 12 31
8

Italy
8 9 6 23
9

Netherlands
8 4 3 15
10

Australia
7 8 9 24
11

South Korea
7 3 6 16
12

Hungary
6 3 4 13
13

Kenya
4 3 0 7
14

Spain
4 1 2 7
15

Jamaica
4 0 2 6
16

New Zealand
3 6 1 10
17

Brazil
3 5 4 12
18

Kazakhstan
3 3 6 12
19

Canada
3 2 9 14
20

Croatia
3 2 0 5
21

North Korea
2 3 2 7
22

Cuba
2 2 4 8
23

Poland
2 2 3 7
24

Thailand
2 2 2 6
25

Colombia
2 2 0 4
26

Uzbekistan
2 1 4 7
27

Belgium
2 1 2 5
27

Switzerland
2 1 2 5
29

Greece
2 1 1 4
30

Argentina
2 1 0 3
31

Iran
2 0 2 4
32

South Africa
1 5 1 7
33

Sweden
1 4 2 7
33

Ukraine
1 4 2 7
35

Denmark
1 3 5 9
36

Armenia
1 3 0 4
37

Belarus
1 2 2 5
38

Slovenia
1 2 1 4
39

Indonesia
1 2 0 3
40

Czech Republic
1 1 5 7
41

Ethiopia
1 1 3 5
41

Georgia
1 1 3 5
43

Romania
1 1 2 4
44

Serbia
1 1 1 3
45

Bahrain
1 1 0 2
45

Slovakia
1 1 0 2
45

Vietnam
1 1 0 2
48

Chinese Taipei
1 0 2 3
49

Independent Olympic Athletes
1 0 1 2
50

Bahamas
1 0 0 1
50

Fiji
1 0 0 1
50

Kosovo
1 0 0 1
50

Puerto Rico
1 0 0 1
50

Singapore
1 0 0 1
55

Azerbaijan
0 3 4 7
56

Malaysia
0 2 1 3
56

Turkey
0 2 1 3
58

Ireland
0 2 0 2
59

Lithuania
0 1 2 3
60

Mongolia
0 1 1 2
61

Algeria
0 1 0 1
61

Grenada
0 1 0 1
61

Philippines
0 1 0 1
61

Qatar
0 1 0 1
61

Venezuela
0 1 0 1
66

Norway
0 0 3 3
67

Egypt
0 0 2 2
67

Israel
0 0 2 2
67

Tunisia
0 0 2 2
70

Austria
0 0 1 1
70

Bulgaria
0 0 1 1
70

Dominican Republic
0 0 1 1
70

Estonia
0 0 1 1
70

Finland
0 0 1 1
70

India
0 0 1 1
70

Kyrgyzstan
0 0 1 1
70

Morocco
0 0 1 1
70

Moldova
0 0 1 1
70

Portugal
0 0 1 1
70

United Arab Emirates
0 0 1 1

Afghanistan
0 0 0 0

Albania
0 0 0 0

American Samoa
0 0 0 0

Andorra
0 0 0 0

Angola
0 0 0 0

Antigua & Barbuda
0 0 0 0

Aruba
0 0 0 0

Bangladesh
0 0 0 0

Barbados
0 0 0 0

Belize
0 0 0 0

Benin
0 0 0 0

Bermuda
0 0 0 0

Bhutan
0 0 0 0

Bolivia
0 0 0 0

Bosnia & Herzegovina
0 0 0 0

Botswana
0 0 0 0

British Virgin Islands
0 0 0 0

Brunei
0 0 0 0

Burkina Faso
0 0 0 0

Burundi
0 0 0 0

Cambodia
0 0 0 0

Cameroon
0 0 0 0

Cape Verde
0 0 0 0

Cayman Islands
0 0 0 0

Central African Republic
0 0 0 0

Chad
0 0 0 0

Chile
0 0 0 0

Comoros
0 0 0 0

Congo
0 0 0 0

Cook Islands
0 0 0 0

Costa Rica
0 0 0 0

Côte d’Ivoire
0 0 0 0

Cyprus
0 0 0 0

Djibouti
0 0 0 0

Dominica
0 0 0 0

DR Congo
0 0 0 0

Ecuador
0 0 0 0

El Salvador
0 0 0 0

Equatorial Guinea
0 0 0 0

Eritrea
0 0 0 0

FYR Macedonia
0 0 0 0

Gabon
0 0 0 0

Gambia
0 0 0 0

Ghana
0 0 0 0

Guam
0 0 0 0

Guatemala
0 0 0 0

Guinea
0 0 0 0

Guinea-Bissau
0 0 0 0

Guyana
0 0 0 0

Haiti
0 0 0 0

Honduras
0 0 0 0

Hong Kong, China
0 0 0 0

Iceland
0 0 0 0

Iraq
0 0 0 0

Jordan
0 0 0 0

Kiribati
0 0 0 0

Laos
0 0 0 0

Latvia
0 0 0 0

Lebanon
0 0 0 0

Lesotho
0 0 0 0

Liberia
0 0 0 0

Libya
0 0 0 0

Liechtenstein
0 0 0 0

Luxembourg
0 0 0 0

Madagascar
0 0 0 0

Malawi
0 0 0 0

Maldives
0 0 0 0

Mali
0 0 0 0

Malta
0 0 0 0

Marshall Islands
0 0 0 0

Mauritania
0 0 0 0

Mauritius
0 0 0 0

Mexico
0 0 0 0

Micronesia
0 0 0 0

Monaco
0 0 0 0

Montenegro
0 0 0 0

Mozambique
0 0 0 0

Myanmar
0 0 0 0

Namibia
0 0 0 0

Nauru
0 0 0 0

Nepal
0 0 0 0

Nicaragua
0 0 0 0

Niger
0 0 0 0

Nigeria
0 0 0 0

Oman
0 0 0 0

Pakistan
0 0 0 0

Palau
0 0 0 0

Palestine
0 0 0 0

Panama
0 0 0 0

Papua New Guinea
0 0 0 0

Paraguay
0 0 0 0

Peru
0 0 0 0

Refugee Olympic Athletes
0 0 0 0

Rwanda
0 0 0 0

Saint Kitts & Nevis
0 0 0 0

Saint Lucia
0 0 0 0

Samoa
0 0 0 0

San Marino
0 0 0 0

Sao Tome & Principe
0 0 0 0

Saudi Arabia
0 0 0 0

Senegal
0 0 0 0

Seychelles
0 0 0 0

Sierra Leone
0 0 0 0

Solomon Islands
0 0 0 0

Somalia
0 0 0 0

South Sudan
0 0 0 0

Sri Lanka
0 0 0 0

St Vincent & the Grenadines
0 0 0 0

Sudan
0 0 0 0

Suriname
0 0 0 0

Swaziland
0 0 0 0

Syria
0 0 0 0

Tajikistan
0 0 0 0

Tanzania
0 0 0 0

Timor-Leste
0 0 0 0

Togo
0 0 0 0

Tonga
0 0 0 0

Trinidad & Tobago
0 0 0 0

Turkmenistan
0 0 0 0

Tuvalu
0 0 0 0

Uganda
0 0 0 0

Uruguay
0 0 0 0

US Virgin Islands
0 0 0 0

Vanuatu
0 0 0 0

Yemen
0 0 0 0

Zambia
0 0 0 0

Zimbabwe
0 0 0 0

Day #12’s events have officially come to a close. Please make sure to check back soon for Day #13 of the Rio 2016 Summer Olympic Games. Thanks to all of you for a great twelfth day and I hope and wish all of you a good night.

Alex Smithson

Welcome to April!

Welcome to April!

Welcome to April! As this month is set to get a little warmer now that the wintry spells have finally passed, it’s great to say that the weather is finally getting better. Despite the odd occasional showers of rain that we’ve had in the last few days, it’s fair to say that the calm has finally arrived after the storm.

As last month was full of energy considering that I had managed to get a large amount of articles in, I want to be able to continue with that energy by publishing a lot more articles over the course of this month. As last month ended on a positive, but sad note, given that the comedy legend, Ronnie Corbett, passed away yesterday at the age of 85, I had made sure to pay tribute to him after learning the news of his passing yesterday morning by publishing a tribute article that would look back on the best moments of his life when he used to star alongside his companion, also his best friend, Ronnie Barker, who passed away 11 years ago in 2005 shortly after The Two Ronnies Sketchbook show ended.

In light of the news earlier today that ITV’s This Morning Agony Aunt, Denise Robertson, passed away yesterday at the age of 83, I will be publishing very soon a tribute article where I will pay my full respects and tributes to her in light of the sad news earlier today.

Also, I wanted to let you all know that it may be difficult over the next few weeks to get more articles in, as I will be starting my Final Major Project when I’m back at college, which will be starting from the moment I go back to college. I will try, however, to get a large amount of articles in as best as I can, but please forgive me if I have trouble in doing so over the next few weeks.

There will be some cases where I will have to put my studies before anything else article-related, as this year, however energetic it has been, has also been a lot busier than the last, and I will be making sure that I can balance the time effectively between both my studies and writing articles for Mother Nature.

The tribute articles I haven’t been able to publish yet are still being worked on, and will take a lot of time, so please be patient for me as I am trying to work extra hard to get them worked on and finished. I will make sure they are published at some point, so please don’t worry too much, as I will be making sure they are done and dusted by the time they eventually get published.

Until then, Welcome to April on Mother Nature!

Alex Smithson

Remembering Ronnie Corbett - A Man of Mighty Humour (1930 - 2016)

Remembering Ronnie Corbett: A Man of Mighty Humour (1930 – 2016)

The world woke up to some sad news today, as the Man of Mighty Humour, Ronnie Corbett, sadly passed away this morning at the age of 85.

Ronnie Corbett used to star alongside his companion, also his close friend, Ronnie Barker, who passed away 11 years ago in 2005, shortly after The Two Ronnies Sketchbook Series came to an end.

I must admit, to hear of this absolutely shocking and sad news this morning of Ronnie Corbett’s passing, I was absolutely shocked, and to be honest, I still cannot take the news of his death in even now, as none of us knew this was going to happen.

In the years I’ve been around, I loved watching The Two Ronnies Sketchbook, as they were always known for putting a smile on my face, with their mischievous sense of humour, but also making everyone else around them smile. Ronnie Corbett was no different to Ronnie Barker, as he always made the eyes of the public laugh everytime he did his own ‘In the Seat’ sketches.

The most memorable part of The Two Ronnies Sketchbook was when I watched Ronnie Corbett and Ronnie Barker dressed up as choir singers, where they literally just sung, but also made fun of themselves in the process.

Another memorable sketch that made me smile was when they did the Cleaning Ladies sketch, when they just sung as they were messing around like no tomorrow, and even that made me laugh, but the one most memorable sketch I remember was when they did the Crossed Lines sketch, where they would be in the same place, and they would phone each other just a walk away from each other, and honestly, I have never laughed so much, but who could forget the funniest sketch of them all?

The Swedish Made Simple sketch where they just used letters to describe certain things we know was just too much to handle. I’ve just watched that sketch again after a while on YouTube, and honestly, it’s still a funny memory to hold in my mind even now, but the comments are just something else. Below are some of the memorable sketches from The Two Ronnies.

To end this tribute article, I just wanted to say that I will never forget you Ronnie Corbett. You are the reason why so many people have smiles on their faces, even mine. Thank you for everything Ronnie. You will be missed dearly, but you will never be forgotten. Thank you for all the happy memories Ronnie Corbett.

In traditional Two Ronnies style: “It’s goodnight from me, and it’s goodnight from him. Goodnight.”

Alex Smithson

Monthly Roundup - January 2016

Monthly Roundup: January 2016

Well I’ve been quite a busy bee since we all welcomed in 2016 on New Year’s Day, but in the first few weeks of 2016, we have lost some notable icons of the film and music industry. On the 10th January 2016, David Bowie sadly passed away at the age of 69 from liver cancer, just two days after releasing his final album, Blackstar, and just four days after his passing, the Harry Potter actor, Alan Rickman also passed away after a battle with pancreatic cancer. I’ve also just heard the news as of lunchtime that Sir Terry Wogan has sadly passed away today after a short battle with cancer. I must admit, I’m really shocked to hear of his passing, because I didn’t know he had cancer until his death was announced earlier today.

Please accept my sincere apologies if I wasn’t able to publish two tribute articles on both of them this month, it’s mainly been because of the fact I’ve been so busy with the current project that I’ve been on that I’ve had trouble with finding the time to do both of the tribute articles. Please don’t worry too much though, because they are currently being made and are in progress, and hopefully, fingers crossed, I can get them published over the course of February or March, depending on the workload I receive from college. I can promise you that I won’t be leaving them to chance, so I will be making sure to work on them as soon as I get a large amount of time on my hands. I can also promise you that I will be, in light of Sir Terry Wogan’s sudden passing earlier today, writing a tribute article on him to pay my full respects and condolences to him and his family at such a sad time.

To round off what has been a really good, but sad start to 2016, I will be taking a full look-back on the articles published over the course of this month.

1.1.2016 – To kick 2016 off with a bang, I welcomed you all back to Mother Nature for the New Year, and with a redesigned appearance, I mentioned that Mother Nature had changed its colours to: “accommodate for a maturer appearance, given that Mother Nature has now evolved into more of a presentable appearance.” I also mentioned that I would be doing some housekeeping, as I would be taking down some articles and some pictures to free up the website space for Mother Nature.

I had also mentioned that this news had come as I wanted to get back to my roots fully of doing more photography articles. However, all wouldn’t be lost though, because any articles I would be taking down would have their spaces filled with some new articles, as I wanted Mother Nature to focus more on photography, but also on certain interests, as I don’t want to talk too much about one thing, knowing full well that the whole idea of this website is to be a photography site.

3.1.2016 – To kick 2016 off with a bang in terms of photography, I did the first Historical Photographer article for 2016 on Walker Evans, who is the second in the Historical Photographers series that I introduced back in December 2015. In this Historical Photographer article, I would talk about Walker Evans’ life, as well as the timeline of events that unfolded up until his death on the 10th April 1975.

Also on this day, I published an article based on my thoughts about maturity and communication in modern society, as I felt that in modern society, maturity was something that shouldn’t really go amiss, especially in our generation and in this day and age, but when it came to maturity in modern society, among many other areas of life, our generation unfortunately lack almost all of maturity.

6.1.2016 – As I wanted to make sure to keep to my promise of being more productive and by also promising to publish more articles on a frequent basis, I started by doing a topic that would focus on whether the media was responsible for promoting eating disorders and negative body image problems in young people. I did also mention that I would tread very carefully when it came to writing this article, as I knew something like this would be sensitive.

8.1.2016 – As I wanted to refer to studying in general, I decided to talk about study time, and whether a large workload from school, college or even university stressed you out. I mentioned that: “Although I believe study time is crucial, I have known on some, if not, a lot of occasions, that it can be stressful, especially when you’re in school, college or university. Over the course of last year, I did notice how stressful the workload was, because I would get on a number of occasions, a lot of work piled on top of me, which, when deadlines were around the corner, I would sometimes panic about any work that may have not been completed, and in a lot of cases, I would often get stressed out.”

15.1.2016 – As violent video games are overruling modern society and my generation nowadays, given that violence is one of the most controversial subjects to talk about, I thought it was good to create a topic of discussion based on whether you thought violent video games should be banned. In this article, I had made sure to give my reasons for why I felt they should be banned, and how banning violent video games could help to prevent the younger generations of today from being brainwashed into committing violence against those around them. I did keep in mind though that a topic like this one is often touchy, and that I would tread very carefully whilst talking about it.

18.1.2016 – As this is something that is close to my heart, which also often bothers me, vanity has been something that I’ve noticed in the real world. In this article, I wrote about how I’ve heard about all these celebrities who have either had work done or had something enhanced to boost their self-esteem, and the same has happened to some of those who aren’t famous at all, and it really bothered me how vanity could cause someone to change something about themselves when they don’t need to.

23.1.2016 – As gangs are becoming a major problem in modern-day life, I focused this topic of discussion on whether the media was responsible for making gang culture seem attractive to young people. I did know for a fact that this was something that some people may be too afraid to talk about, but I decided to stand up and speak up about this topic in detail because I would not hide my views on gang culture, as I would make sure to outline in this topic whether I thought the media was responsible for making gang culture seem attractive to young people.

Also on this day, I published two more articles, one of which focused on my trip up to the Croydon Museum, as the museum contains so much information and research “based on a large number of photographers, as well as certain collector’s items, such as an old-fashioned retro 1950s car.”, while the third article was based on uplifting photo moments, given that I took a photo of Croydon College’s Rotunda, as well as getting a photo with The One Show’s Marty Jopson, who is such a nice guy and so down to earth.

30.1.2016 – With it being in the last couple of years since I last visited, and despite the fact my feet were killing me as a result of going up to London for this trip, I went on a trip up to the Science Museum with my class, and while we were there, I wanted to get some photos of the museum, considering that the last time I went, it had a dramatic overhaul in design, and not only that, but some or most parts of the museum had changed from when I made my first ever visit to the Science Museum.

Also, on the same day that I went up to London with my class for a trip to the Science Museum, we also went to the Natural History Museum to study further for our stop-frame animation project. While we were there, I also took a large number of photos, considering that I took a trip up to the Science Museum. It was also the first time in nearly 15 years since I last visited the Natural History Museum.

As I published both of these articles on this day, I wanted them both to be like a two-part photography article, in other words, a 2-in-1 article.

Thank you so much everyone for making the first month of 2016 a really good one for me. I know this month hasn’t been as easy as first thought given that we’ve lost quite a few celebrity icons in the first few weeks, but to David Bowie, Alan Rickman & Sir Terry Wogan, all three of you will be remembered in our hearts forever and you shall never be forgotten.

Again, thank you for making the first month of 2016 a really good one for me, and I’ll see you all in February.

Alex Smithson

Eva Perón - Image for Case Study #7

Case Study #7: Eva Perón | 7th May 1919 – 26th July 1952 | Spiritual Leader of the Nation of Argentina.

Following on from the lengthy case study, Case Study #6, which focused on John Fitzgerald Kennedy, comes Case Study #7, which will now focus on the Spiritual Leader of the Nation of Argentina, Eva Perón. This case study will focus on Eva Perón’s life as it unfolded, featuring specific moments and highlights of her career up until her death at the age of 33 on the 26th July 1952.

María Eva Duarte de Perón (7th May 1919 – 26th July 1952)

Eva Person was the second wife of the Argentinian President, Juan Perón (1895 – 1974) and had also served as the First Lady of Argentina from 1946 until her death in 1952. She is also best known by the name, Evita.

She was born in the rural village of Los Toldos, in Pampas, as the youngest of 5 children and at the age of 15 in 1934, Eva Perón had moved to the nation’s capital of Buenos Aires to pursue a career as a stage, radio and film actress. There, she had met the Colonel, Juan Perón on the 22nd January 1944 during a charity event at the Luna Park Stadium to benefit the victims of the San Juan Earthquake in Argentina.

Both Eva & Juan Perón were married the following year, and Juan Perón was elected as the President of Argentina in 1946. During the course of the last 6 years of her life, Eva Perón had become a powerful figure within the pro-Perónist trade unions, primarily for speaking on behalf of the labor rights. She had also ran the Ministries of Labor and Health, where she had founded and ran the charitable Eva Perón Foundation, championed the women’s suffrage in Argentina, and had also founded and also ran the nation’s first large-scale female political party, which was the Female Perónist Party.

In 1951, Eva Perón had announced her candidacy for the Perónist nomination for the office of Vice President of Argentina, where she had received a lot of great support from the Perónist political base, low-income and working-class Argentines, who were ultimately referred to as the descamisados, or the “shirtless ones“. However, her opposition from the nation’s military and bourgeoisie, which coupled also with her declining health, had ultimately forced her to withdraw her candidacy. In 1952, shortly just before her death from Ovarian Cancer at the age of 33, Eva Perón was given the title of the “Spiritual Leader of the Nation” by the Argentine Congress, and just after her death, Eva Perón was given a state funeral, a prerogative that was generally reserved for the heads of state.

Eva Perón has become a massive part of international popular culture, most famously as the subject of the musical, Evita (1976). Cristina Álvarez Rodríguez, who was Evita’s great-niece, claimed that Evita had never left the collective consciousness of Argentines, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who was the first elected female President for Argentina, claimed that the women of her generation owe a debt to Eva Perón for “her example of passion and combativeness”. She had also elicited some controversy for how she would wield the power and the control that she had at her peak.

Eva Perón’s Early Life (Her Early Childhood, Junin and the Move to Buenos Aires)

Eva Perón’s autobiography, La Razón de mi Vida, contains no dates or even any references to her childhood occurrences, and the autobiography doesn’t list her birth place or even her name at birth. According to Junin’s civil registry, a birth certificate had shown that one Maria Eva Duarte was born on the 7th May 1922. Her baptismal certificate, however, listed another date of birth of the 7th May 1919 under the name, Eva Maria Ibarguren. It is thought, however, that in 1945, the adult Eva Perón had created a forgery of her birth certificate for her marriage.

Eva Perón had spent her childhood in Junin, in the Buenos Aires Province. Her parents, Juan Duarte, and Juana Ibarguren (sometimes referred to as Doña Juana), were descended from Basque immigrants. Juan Duarte, a wealthy rancher from nearby Chivilcoy, already had a wife and family there, and at that time in rural Argentina, it wasn’t uncommon for a wealthy man to have multiple families.

When Eva was a year old, Duarte had returned permanently to his legal family, leaving Juana Ibarguren and her children in severe penury. Ibarguren and her children were forced to move to the poorest area of Junin. Los Toldos was a village in the dusty region of Las Pampas, with a reputation as a desolate place of abject poverty. To support herself and her children, Ibarguren had sewed clothes for neighbours. The family, however, was stigmatised by the abandonment of the father and by the illegitimate status of the children under Argentine law, and was consequently somewhat isolated. A desire to expunge this part of her life may have been the motivation for Eva Perón to arrange the destruction of her original birth certificate in 1945.

When Duarte had suddenly died and his mistress and their children sought to attend his funeral, there was an unpleasant scene at the church gates. Although Juana and the children were permitted to enter and pay their respects to Duarte, they were promptly directed out of the church, and Mrs. Juan Duarte did not want her husband’s mistress and children at the funeral, and, as those of the legitimate wife, her orders were respected.

Junín
Prior to the abandonment of Juana Ibarguren, Juan Duarte had been her sole means of support, and the biographer, John Barnes, wrote that after this abandonment, all that Duarte had left to the family was a document that declared that the children were his, which had thus enabled them to use the Duarte surname. Soon after, Juana had moved her children to a one-room apartment in Junín.
To pay the rent on their single-roomed home, the mother and daughters had taken up the job roles of being the cooks in the houses of the local estancias.
Eventually owing to Eva’s older brother’s financial help, the family had moved into a bigger house, which they had later transformed into a boarding house, and it was during this time that young Eva had often participated in school plays and also in concerts. One of her favourite past-times was the cinema, and although Eva Perón’s mother had apparently had a few plans for her, wanting to marry her off to one of the local bachelors, Eva had herself, dreamed of becoming a famous actress.
Her love of acting was reinforced when, in the October of 1933, she had played a small role in a school play, which was called: “Arriba estudiantes (Students Arise)“, in which Barnes describes the school play as “an emotional, patriotic, flag-waving melodrama.” After the play, Eva Perón was determined to become an actress.
The Move to Buenos Aires
In Eva Perón’s autobiography, she had explained that all of the people from her own town who had been to the big cities had described them as “marvellous places, where nothing was given but wealth”, and in 1934, at just the age of 15, Eva had escaped her poverty-stricken village, when, according to a popular myth, she ran off with a young musician to the nation’s capital of Buenos Aires. The young couple’s relationship would end almost as quickly as it began, but she had, however, remained in Buenos Aires.
Eva Perón had begun to pursue jobs on the stage and also on the radio, and she had eventually become a film actress. She had a series of relationships, and via some of these men, she did have to acquire a number of her modelling appointments. She had bleached her natural black hair to blonde, a look of which that she would maintain for the duration of her life.
It’s often reported that Eva had travelled to Buenos Aires by train with the tango singer, Agustín Magaldi. However, the biographers, Marysa Navarro and Nicholas Fraser, have maintained that this is unlikely, as there is no record of the married Magaldi performing in Junín in 1934 (and even if he had, he would usually travel with his wife). Eva’s sisters have maintained that Eva Perón travelled to Buenos Aires with their mother. Her sister’s have also claimed that Doña Juana had accompanied her daughter to an audition at a radio station and had arranged for Eva Perón to live with the Bustamontes family, who were friends of the Duarte family. While the method of Eva Perón’s escape from her bleak provincial surroundings is debated, she did, however, begin a new life in Buenos Aires.
Buenos Aires in the 1930s was known as the “Paris of South America”, as the centre of the city had many cafés, restaurants, theatres, movie houses, shops and also bustling crowds. In directive contrast, the 1930s were also the years of great unemployment, poverty and hunger in the capital, and many of the new arrivals from the interiors were forced to live in tenements, boarding houses and in the outlying shanties that had become known as villas miserias.
Upon her arrival in Buenos Aires, Eva Duarte Perón had to face the difficulties of surviving without formal education or connections, as the city was especially overcrowded during this period of time because of the migrations that were caused by the Great Depression. On the 28th March 1935, Eva Perón had her professional debut in the play: “Mrs. Perez (la Señora de Pérez)” at the Comedias Theatre.
In 1936, Eva Perón had toured nationally with a theatre company, and worked as a model, and not only that, but she was also cast in a few of the B-grade movie melodramas. In 1942, Eva Perón had experienced some economic stability when a company, called Candilejas (which was sponsored by a soap manufacturer) had hired her for a daily role in one of their radio dramas, called Muy bien, which had aired on Radio El Mundo (World Radio), which was also the most important radio station in the country at that time.
Later that year, Eva had signed a five-year contract with Radio Belgrano, which would assure her the role in a popular historical-drama programme, called: “Great Women of History“, in which she would play as Elizabeth I of England, Sarah Bernhardt, and the last Tsarina of Russia. Eventually, Eva Duarte Perón had come to co-own the radio company, and by 1943, she was earning five or six thousand pesos a month, which made her one of the highest-paid radio actresses in the nation. Pablo Raccioppi, who had jointly ran Radio El Mundo with Eva Duarte was said to have not liked her, but had noted that she was “thoroughly dependable”.
Eva Perón also had a short-lived film career, as none of the films in which she had starred in were hugely successful. In one of her last films, La cabalgata del circo (The Circus Cavalcade), Eva Perón had played a young country girl who had rivalled an older woman, the movie star, Libertad Lamarque.
As a result of her success with radio dramas and the films, Eva Perón had achieved some financial stability, and in 1942, she was able to move into her own apartment in the exclusive neighbourhood of Recoleta, on 1567 Calle Posadas Street. The next year, Eva Perón had begun her career in politics, as one of the founders of the Argentine Radio Syndicate (ARA).
Eva’s Early Relationship with Juan Perón
On the 15th January 1944, an earthquake had occurred in the town of San Juan, in Argentina, which killed some 10,000 people, and in response to this, Perón, who was then the Secretary of Labour, had established a fund which would help to raise money to help all those that were affected. He had then devised a plan, which was to have an “artistic festival” as a fundraiser, and it was at this point that he had also invited radio and film actors to participate.
After a week of fundraising, all of the participants had met at a gala, which was held at the Luna Park Stadium in Buenos Aires to benefit the earthquake victims, and it was at this gala, that on the 22nd January 1944, where Eva Duarte would first meet Colonel Juan Perón. Eva had promptly became the colonel’s mistress, and she had even referred to the day that she had met her future husband as her “marvelous day”. Fraser and Navarro had written that Juan Perón and Eva had left together at around two in the morning.
Fraser and Navarro had claimed that Eva Duarte had no knowledge of interest in politics prior to meeting Juan Perón, therefore, she would never argue with Perón or any of his inner circle, but would merely absorb what she had heard. Juan Perón had later claimed in his memoir that he had purposefully selected Eva to be his pupil, and had set out to create in her a “second I.”
However, Fraser and Navarro had suggested that Juan Perón had allowed Eva Duarte such intimate exposure and knowledge of his inner circle because of his age, because he was 48 years old and she was 24 years old when they both met. He had come to politics later on in life, and was therefore free of the preconceived ideas of how his political career should be conducted, and he was willing to accept whatever aid she would offer him.
In May 1944, it was announced that any broadcast performers must organise themselves into a union, and that this union would be the only union that would be allowed to operate in Argentina. Shortly after the union was formed, Eva Duarte was elected as its President. Fraser and Navarro had speculated that Juan Perón made the suggestion that the performers should create a union, and that the other performers likely felt that it was a form of good politics to elect his mistress.
Shortly after she was elected as the President of the Union, Eva Duarte had begun a daily program that was called: “Toward a Better Future”, which would dramatise in soap opera form, in order to make these accomplishments for Juan Perón. Often, Perón’s own speeches were played during the program, and when she spoke, Eva Duarte would speak in her ordinary language as a regular woman who would want her listeners to believe what she, herself, had believed about Juan Perón.
Eva’s Rise to Power
Juan Perón’s arrest
By early 1945, a group of Army officers that were called the GOU, which stands for: “Grupo de Oficiales Unidos” (United Officers Group), also nicknamed: “The Colonels”, had gained considerable influence within the Argentinian Government. The President, Pedro Pablo Ramírez had become very wary of Juan Perón’s growing power with the government, but was unable to curb that power, and on the 24th February 1944, Ramírez had signed his own resignation paper, which Fraser and Navarro had claimed was drafted by Juan Perón himself.
Edelmiro Julián Farrell, who was a friend of Juan Perón, became the President, and Juan Perón had returned to his job as the Labor Minister, though it was claimed by Fraser and Navarro that by this point, Juan Perón was the most powerful man in the Argentinian Government. On the 9th October 1945, Juan Perón was arrested by his opponents within the government, who had feared that due to the strong support of the descamisados, the workers and the poor of the nation, Perón’s popularity might eclipse that of the sitting President.
Six days later, between 250,000 to 350,000 people had gathered in front of the Casa Rosada, which was Argentina’s Government House, to demand Juan Perón’s release, and their wish was granted, and at 11:00 PM, Juan Perón had stepped on to the balcony of the Casa Rosada and addressed the crowd. The biographer, Robert D. Crassweller, had claimed that this moment was very powerful because it was very dramatic, and he had recalled many of the important aspects of Argentina’s history.
Crassweller had written that Juan Perón had enacted the role of a caudillo by addressing his people in the tradition of Argentine leaders, Rosas and Yrigoyen. He had also claimed that the evening had contained “mystic overtones” of a “quasi-religious” nature. Eva Perón was often credited with organising the rally of thousands that freed Juan Perón from prison on the 17th October 1945. This version of events was mainly popularised in the movie version of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical, which was based on Evita, though most of the historians, however, agreed that these version of events were unlikely.
At the time of Juan Perón’s imprisonment, Eva was still merely an actress, as she had no political clout with the various labor unions, and it was also claimed that she was not well-liked within Perón’s inner circle, nor was she liked by many within the film and radio businesses at this point. When Juan Perón was imprisoned, Eva Duarte Perón was suddenly disenfranchised, and in reality, the massive rally that had freed Juan Perón from prison was organised by the various unions, such as the General Labor Confederation, or CGT as they had come to be known.
To this day, the 17th October is something of a holiday for the Justicialist Party in Argentina (which is celebrated as Día de la Lealtad, or “Loyalty Day”). What would follow soon after was shocking and was also nearly unheard of. The well-connected and politically rising star, Juan Perón, married Eva Duarte, and despite Eva’s childhood illegitimacy, and having an uncertain reputation, Perón was in love with Eva, and her loyal devotion to him, even while he was under arrest, touched him deeply, and so he married her, which would provide her a respectability that she had never known. Eva & Juan Perón were married discreetly in a civil ceremony by Junín on the 18th October 1945, and also in a church wedding on the 9th December 1945.
The 1946 Presidential Election Victory
After he was released from prison, Juan Perón had decided to campaign for the Presidency of the Nation, to which he had won a landslide, and Eva had campaigned heavily for her husband during his 1946 Presidential Bid. Using her weekly radio show, she would deliver powerful speeches with heavy populist rhetorics, which would urge the poor to align themselves with Perón’s movement. Although she had become wealthy from her radio and modelling successes, she had also highlighted her own humble upbringing as a way of showing her solidarity with the impoverished classes.
Along with her husband, Eva Perón had visited every corner of the country, which would make her become the first woman in Argentina’s history to appear in public on the campaign trail with her husband. Eva’s appearance alongside her husband would often offend the establishment of the wealthy, the military, especially those in political life. However, she was also very popular with the general public who had known her from her radio and motion picture appearances. It was during this phase of her life that she had first encouraged the Argentinian population to refer to her, not as “Eva Perón”, but simply as “Evita”, which is a Spanish diminutive or affectionate nickname that is roughly equivalent to “Little Eva” or “Evie”.
Eva’s European Tour
In 1947, Eva had embarked on a much-publicised “Rainbow Tour” of Europe, where she would meet with the numerous dignitaries and heads of state, such as Francisco Franco and Pope Pius XII. The biographers, Fraser and Navarro had written that the tour had its genesis in an invitation that the Spanish leader had extended to Juan Perón. For political reasons, it was decided that Eva Perón, rather than Juan Perón, should make the visit. Fraser and Navarro had written that Argentina had only recently emerged from its “wartime quarantine”, thus taking its place in the United Nations (UN), and improving relations with the United States.
Therefore, a visit to Franco, with António Salazar of Portugal, who was the last remaining West European Authoritarian Leaders in power, would be diplomatically frowned upon internationally. Fraser and Navarro had written that Eva had decided that, if Juan Perón would not accept Franco’s invitation for a state visit to Spain, then she would. The advisors would then decide that Eva should visit many European countries, in addition to Spain. This would make it seem that Eva’s sympathies were not specifically with Franco’s fascist Spain, but with all of Europe. The tour was billed, not as a political tour, but as a non-political “goodwill” tour.
Eva Perón was well received in Spain, where she had visited the tombs of the Spanish monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella in the Capilla Real de Granada. Francoist Spain had not recovered from the Spanish Civil War (the autarkic economy and the UN embargo had meant that the country couldn’t feed its people). During her visit to Spain, Eva Perón had handed out 100-peseta notes to many of the poor children that she had met on her journey, and she had also received from Franco the highest award that was given by the Spanish government, the Order of Isabella the Catholic.
Eva had then visited Rome, where the reception wasn’t as warm as it had been for her in Spain, and although Pope Pius XII didn’t give her a Papal decoration, she was allowed the time usually allotted for any queens and was given a rosary. Her next stop was France, where she was generally well received, and she had visited the Palace of Versailles, amongst other sites. She had also met with Charles de Gaulle, and was promised by France with two shipments of wheat.
Whilst she was in France, Eva Perón had received word that George VI would not receive her when she planned to visit Britain, regardless of what his Foreign Office might advise, and that her visit would not be viewed as a state visit. Fraser and Navarro had written that Eva had regarded the Royal Family’s refusal to meet her as a snub, and it was from there that she had cancelled her trip to the United Kingdom. Eva had, however, given the official reason of “exhaustion” for her on not going on to Britain.
Eva had also visited Switzerland during her European tour, a visit that was viewed as the worst part of the trip. According to the book: “Evita: A Biography by John Barnes”, while she was travelling down a street with many people crowding her car, someone had thrown two stones and smashed the windshield. She had thrown her hands up in shock, but was not injured. Later on, whilst she was sitting with the Foreign Minister, protesters had thrown tomatoes at her, but the tomatoes had hit the Foreign Minister and they splattered onto Eva’s dress. After these two events occurred, Eva had had enough, and after two months, she had returned to Argentina.
The Members of the Perónist opposition had speculated that the true purpose of the European tour was to deposit the funds into a Swiss bank account. “The opposition in Buenos Aires”, which was written by Fraser and Navarro, had “assumed that the genuine purpose of the whole European visit was for Eva and her husband to deposit money in Swiss bank accounts, and that the rest had been devised to conceal this. Many wealthy Argentines did this, but there are many more convenient and less conspicuous ways of depositing money in Swiss accounts than meeting the Swiss Foreign Minister and being shown around a watch factory.” Fraser and Navarro had concluded with: “Was there a Swiss bank account? It seems unlikely.”
During her tour to Europe, Eva Perón was featured in a cover story for TIME Magazine, and the cover’s caption–”Eva Perón: Between two worlds, an Argentine rainbow”– was a reference to the name that was given to Eva’s European tour, The Rainbow Tour. This had been the only time in the periodical’s history that a South American first lady had appeared alone on its cover. In 1951, Eva had appeared again with Juan Perón. However, the 1947 cover story had also been the first publication that had mentioned that Eva Perón was born out-of-wedlock. In retaliation, the periodical had been banned from Argentina for several months.
After returning to Argentina from Europe, Evita had never again appeared in public with the complicated hairdos of her movie star days. The brilliant gold colour had become more subdued in tone, and not only that, but the style had changed as well, as her hair was pulled back severely into a heavy braided chignon. Additionally, her extravagant clothing had become more refined after the tour. She had no longer wore the elaborate hats, and neither the form-fitting dresses of the Argentinian designers.
It was soon after, however, that she had adopted a simpler, yet more fashionable Paris couture, and she had become particularly attached to the fashions of Christian Dior, as well as the jewels of Cartier. In an attempt to cultivate a more serious political persona, Eva Perón had began to appear in public by wearing conservative, though stylish tailleurs (which was a business-like combination of both skirts and jackets), which were also made by Christian Dior, and other Paris couture houses.
Eva’s Charitable & Feminist Works
The Eva Perón Foundation
The Sociedad de Beneficencia (Society of Beneficience), a charity group that was made up of 87 society ladies, was responsible for most of the charity works in Buenos Aires, prior to the election of Juan Perón. Fraser and Navarro had written that at one point, the Sociedad had been an enlightened institution, which had cared for orphans and homeless women, but those days had long since passed by the time of the first term of Juan Perón, and in the 1800s, the Sociedad had been supported by the private contributions, largely by those of the husbands of the society ladies, but by the 1940s, the Sociedad was supported by the government.
It has been the tradition of the Sociedad to elect the First Lady of Argentina as the President of the charity, but the ladies of the Sociedad hadn’t approved of Eva Perón’s impoverished background, let alone her lack of formal education, as well as her former career as an actress. Fraser and Navarro had written that the ladies of the Sociedad were afraid that Evita would set a bad example for the orphans, and it was therefore that the society ladies did not extend to Evita the position of President of their organisation.
It has often been said that Evita had the government funding for the Sociedad cut off in retaliation, though Fraser and Navarro have suggested that these version of events are in dispute, but that the government funding that had previously supported the Sociedad had now gone to support Evita’s own foundation. The Fundación María Eva Duarte de Perón was created on the 8th July 1948, but it was later renamed to, quite simply, the Eva Perón Foundation, and its funding had begun with 10,000 pesos being provided by Evita herself.
In “The Woman with the Whip”, which was the first English language biography of Eva Perón’s, the author, Mary Main, wrote that no account records were kept for the foundation because it was merely a means of funnelling the government money into private Swiss bank accounts, which would be controlled by the Perón’s. Fraser and Navarro, however, have countered these claims by writing that Ramón Cereijo, the Minister of Finance, had kept records, and that the foundation had “began as the simplest response to the poverty (Evita) encountered each day in her office” as well as “the appalling backwardness of social services—or charity, as it was still called—in Argentina.”
Crassweller had written that the foundation was supported by the donations of cash and goods from the Perónist unions and private businesses, and that the Confederación General del Trabajo had donated three man-days (which was later reduced to two) of salary for every worker per year. The tax on the lottery and movie tickets had also helped to support the foundation, as did a levy on casino and revenue from the horse races. Crassweller had also noted that there were some cases of businesses being pressured to donate to the foundation, with negative repercussions being the result if the requests for donations weren’t met.
Within a few years, the foundation had received assets in cash and goods in excess of 3 billion pesos, or over $200 million at the exchange rate of the late 1940s. It had employed 14,000 workers, 6,000 of whom were construction workers, and 26 priests. It had purchased and distributed annually 400,000 pairs of shoes, 500,000 sewing machines and 200,000 cooking pots. The foundation had also given scholarships, and had also built homes, hospitals, as well as other charitable institutions. Every aspect of the foundation was under Eva’s supervision. The foundation had also built entire communities, such as Evita City, which still exists today. Fraser and Navarro have claimed that due to the works and health services of the foundation, for the first time in history, there was no inequality in the Argentinian health care system.
Fraser and Navarro had also written that it was Eva’s work with the foundation that had played a large role in her idealisation, even leading some to consider her as being a saint, and although it was unnecessary from a practical standpoint, Eva had set aside many hours per day to meet with the poor who had requested help from her foundation, and during these meetings with the poor, Eva had often kissed the poor, and had also allowed them to kiss her.
Eva was even witnessed placing her hands on the suppurated wounds of the sick and poor, touching the leprous, and also kissing the syphilitic. Fraser and Navarro had written that though Argentina is secular in many respects, it was also essentially a Catholic country. Therefore, when Evita had kissed the syphilitic and touched the leprous, she had “…ceased to be the President’s wife and acquired some of the characteristics of saints depicted in Catholicism.”
The poet, José María Castiñeira de Dios, a man who had come from a wealthy background, had reflected on the times he had witnessed Eva meeting with the poor, by saying that: “I had had a sort of literary perception of the people and the poor and she had given me a Christian one, thus allowing me to become a Christian in the profoundest sense….”.
Fraser and Navarro had written that towards the end of her life, Eva Perón was working from as many as 20 to 22 hours per day in her foundation, and had often ignored her own husband’s request that she cut back on her workload and take the weekends off. The more that she had worked with the poor in her foundation, the more she had adopted an outraged attitude towards the existence of poverty, by saying: “Sometimes I have wished my insults were slaps or lashes. I’ve wanted to hit people in the face to make them see, if only for a day, what I see each day I help the people.”
Crassweller had written that Eva had become very fanatical about her work in the foundation, and had also felt on a crusade against the very concept and existence of poverty, as well as social ills. “It is not surprising”, wrote Crassweller: “that as her public crusades and her private adorations took on a narrowing intensity after 1946, they simultaneously veered toward the transcendental.” Crassweller had compared Evita to Ignatius Loyola, by saying that she had come to be akin to a one-woman Jesuit Order.
The Female Perónist Party & The Women’s Suffrage
The biographers, Fraser and Navarro, had written that Eva Perón was often credited with gaining the right to vote for Argentinian women, and while she did make the radio addresses in support of the women’s suffrage, as well as publishing articles in her Democracia newspaper, asking male Perónists to support the women’s rights to vote, ultimately, the ability to grant to all women the right to vote was beyond Eva’s powers. Fraser and Navarro had claimed that Eva’s actions were limited to supporting a bill, which was introduced by one of her supporters, Eduardo Colom, a bill which was eventually dropped.
A new women’s suffrage bill was introduced, to which the Senate of Argentina had sanctioned on the 21st August 1946, and that it was necessary to wait more than a year before the House of Representatives had sanctioned it on the 9th September 1947. Law 13,010 had established the equality of the political rights between men and women, as well as the universal suffrage in Argentina. Finally, Law 13,010 was approved unanimously, and in a public celebration and ceremony, Juan Perón had signed the law, which granted all women the rights to vote, and then he handed the bill to Eva Perón, which would symbolically make it hers.
Eva Perón had then created the Female Perónist Party, which was the first large female political party in the nation. Fraser and Navarro had written that by 1951, the party had 500,000 members, and also 3,600 headquarters across the country. Fraser and Navarro had also written that while Eva Perón did not consider herself to be a feminist, her impact on the political life of women was decisive. Thousands of previously apolitical women had entered politics because of Eva, and they were the first women to be active in Argentinian politics. The combination of female suffrage, and the organisation of the Female Perónist Party had granted Juan Perón a large majority (63%) of the vote in the 1951 Presidential Election.
The 1951 Presidential Election – The Vice Presidential Nomination, Eva’s Declining Health, the Re-Election and Spiritual Leader of the Nation.
In 1951, Eva had set her sights on earning a place on the ballot as a candidate for Vice-President. This move had angered many of the military leaders who had despised Eva and her increasing powers within the government. According to the Argentine Constitution, the Vice President automatically succeeds the President in the event of the President’s death. The possibility of Eva becoming the President in the event of Juan Perón’s death was not something that the military could accept.
She did, however, receive great support from the working class, the unions, and the Perónist Women’s Party. The intensity of the support that she had drawn from these groups is said to have surprised even Juan Perón himself. Fraser and Navarro had written that the wide support Eva’s proposed candidacy had generated had indicated to him that Eva had become as important to the members of the Perónist party as Juan Perón himself was.
On the 22nd August 1951, the unions had held a mass rally of two million people, called: “Cabildo Abierto.” (The name “Cabildo Abierto” was a reference and tribute to the first local Argentinian government of the May Revolution in 1810.) The Perón’s had addressed the crowd from the balcony of a huge scaffolding that was set up on the Avenida 9 de Julio, which was several blocks away from the Casa Rosada, the official government house of Argentina. Overhead were the two large portraits of Eva and Juan Perón, and it was claimed that the “Cabildo Abierto” was the largest public display of support in history for a female political figure.
At the mass rally, the crowd had demanded that Eva Perón should publicly announce her candidacy as Vice President, though she had pleaded for more time in order to make her decision. The exchange between Evita and the crowd of two million had become, for a time, a genuine and spontaneous dialogue, with the crowd, chanting: “¡Evita, Vice-Presidente!” When Evita had asked for more time so that she could make up her mind, the crowd had demanded, “¡Ahora, Evita, ahora!” (“Now, Evita, now!”). Eventually, they had come to a compromise, and Evita had told the audience that she would announce her decision over the radio a few days later.
Eva Duarte Perón’s Declining Health
Eventually, she had declined the invitation to run for Vice-President, by saying that her only ambition was that—in the large chapter of history that would be written about her husband—the footnotes would mention a woman who had brough the “…hopes and dreams of the people to the president”, a woman who would eventually turn those hopes and dreams into “glorious reality.” In the Perónist rhetoric, this event had come to be referred to as “The Resurrection”, which would portray Evita as being a selfless woman in line with the Hispanic myth of marianismo.
Most of the biographers, however, have postulated that Evita didn’t so much renounce her ambition, as well as bowing to the pressure from her husband, the military, and the Argentine upper class, who had preferred that she doesn’t enter the race.
On the 9th January 1950, Eva Duarte Perón had fainted in public and had undergone surgery three days later, and although it was reported that she had undergone an appendectomy, she was diagnosed with advanced cervical cancer. These fainting bouts had continued through 1951 (including the evening after “Cabildo abierto”), with extreme weakness and severe vaginal bleeding.
By 1951, it had become evident that Eva’s health was rapidly deteriorating, and although her diagnosis was withheld from her by Juan, she already knew that she wasn’t well, and a bid for the Vice-Presidency was not practical. Only a few months after “the Renunciation”, Evita had undergone a secret radical hysterectomy in an attempt to eradicate her advanced cervical cancer. In 2011, a Yale neurosurgeon had studied Eva’s skull x-rays and the photographic evidence and the neurosurgeon had said that Perón may have been given a prefrontal lobotomy in the last months of her life: “…to relieve the pain, agitation and anxiety she suffered in the final months of her illness.”
On the 4th June 1952, Eva Duarte Perón had ridden with Juan Perón in a parade through Buenos Aires in celebration of his re-election as the President of Argentina. Eva was by this point so unwell that she was unable to stand without support. Underneath her oversized fur coat was a frame that was made of plaster and wire that would allow her to stand, and she took a triple dose of painkillers before the parade, and also took another two doses when she had returned home.
In the ceremony, a few days after Juan Perón’s second inauguration, Eva Duarte Perón was given the official title of the “Spiritual Leader of the Nation.”
Eva Duarte Perón’s Death & Aftermath
Although Eva had undergone a hysterectomy that was performed by the American surgeon, George T. Pack, the cancer had metastasized and had returned rapidly. Eva was the first Argentine to undergo chemotherapy (which was a novel treatment at that time). Despite all of the available treatment that she was given, she had become emaciated, and weighed only 36 kg (79 lb) by June 1952. Eva Duarte Perón sadly passed away on Saturday 26th July 1952, at 8:25 PM, at the age of 33.
The Radio broadcasts throughout the country were interrupted with the announcement that: “The Press Secretary’s Office of the Presidency of the Nation fulfills its very sad duty to inform the people of the Republic that at 20:25 hours Mrs. Eva Perón, Spiritual Leader of the Nation, died.” Ordinary activities were ceased; any movies that were playing were stopped; all restaurants were closed and the patrons were shown to the door.
Mourning
Immediately after Eva’s passing, the government had suspended all official activities for two days and had ordered that all flags would be flown at half-mast for ten full days. It had soon become apparent, however, that these measures had fallen short of reflecting popular grief, and the crowd that were outside of the presidential residence, where Evita died, had grown dense, and had congested the streets for ten blocks in each direction.
The morning after Eva’s death, while her body was being moved to the Ministry of Labour Building, eight people were crushed to death in the throngs, and in the following 24 hours, over 2,000 people were treated in city hospitals for the injuries that they sustained in the rush to be near Evita as her body was being transported, and thousands more would be treated on the spot. For the following two weeks, the lines would stretch for many city blocks with mourners waiting for hours to see Eva Duarte Perón’s body lying at the Ministry of Labour.
The streets of Buenos Aires had overflowed with gigantic piles of flowers, and within a day of Eva’s death, all of the flower shops in Buenos Aires had run out of stock. A lot of flowers were to be flown in from all over the country, and as far away as Chile, and despite the fact that Eva Perón had never held a political office, she was eventually given a state funeral, which was usually reserved for a head of state, along with a full Roman Catholic requiem mass. A memorial was held for the Argentinian team during the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki due to Eva Duarte Perón’s death during those Olympic Games.
On Saturday 9th August, the body was transferred to the Congress Building for an additional day of public viewing, and a memorial service was attended by the entire Argentine legislative body. The next day, after a final Mass, the coffin was laid on a gun carriage that was pulled by the CGT officials. It was then followed by Perón, his cabinet, Eva’s family and friends, including the delegates and representatives of the Partido Peronista Femenino—then workers, nurses and students of the Eva Perón Foundation. Flowers were thrown from balconies and windows.
There were different interpretations of the popular mourning of Eva’s death. Some reporters had viewed the mourning as being authentic, while others saw the public succumbing to another of the “passion plays” of the Perónist regime. TIME Magazine had reported that the Perónist government had enforced the observance of a daily period of five minutes of mourning, following a daily radio announcement.
During Perón’s time, the children that were born to unmarried parents did not have the same legal rights as those born to married parents, though the biographer, Julie M. Taylor, the professor of anthropology at the Rice University, has said that Evita was well aware of the pain of being born “illegitimate”. Taylor speculated that Eva’s awareness of this may have influenced her decision to have the law changed, so that “illegitimate” children could henceforth be referred to as “natural” children.
Upon her death, the Argentine public was told that Evita was only 30 years old, though the discrepancy was meant to dovetail with Evita’s earlier tampering with her birth certificate, and after becoming the First Lady in 1946, Evita had her birth records altered to read that she was born to married parents, and she placed her birth date three years forward, making herself younger.
Memorial Plans
Shortly after her death, Dr. Pedro Ara was approached to embalm Eva’s body, though Fraser and Navarro had written that it was doubtful that Evita had ever expressed a wish to be embalmed, and they also suggested that it was most likely Juan Perón’s decision. Dr. Pedro Ara was a professor of anatomy who had studied in Vienna and had maintained an academic career in Madrid. His work was occasionally referred to as “the art of death.” His highly advanced embalming technique had consisted of replacing the corpse’s blood with glycerine, which would preserve all of the organs, including the brain, which would create a lifelike appearance, giving the body the appearance of: “artistically rendered sleep”.
Dr. Pedro Ara was known in the Buenos Aires society for his work, and among the people he had embalmed was the Spanish composer, Manuel de Falla. Dr. Pedro Ara had claimed that his embalming of Evita’s corpse had begun on the night of her death, and that by the next morning, “the body of Eva Perón was completely and infinitely incorruptible”, and suitable for display to the public.
In the book: “Perón and the Enigmas of Argentina”, the biographer, Robert D. Crassweller had claimed that the English-speaking nations of North America and Europe had largely misunderstood Argentina’s response to the death of Eva Perón as well as the ornate funeral that she was granted. Crassweller also attributed this misunderstanding to the unique cultural makeup of the Perón’s and Argentina, by saying that the Perón’s were of the Hispanic tradition and that their opposition was largely of the British Ancestry.
The Disappearance & The Return of Eva Duarte Perón’s Corpse
Shortly after Eva’s death, plans were made to construct a memorial in her honour, and the monument, which was to be a statue of a man representing the descamisados, was projected to be larger than the Statue of Liberty. Eva’s body was to be stored in the base of the monument, and in the tradition of Lenin’s corpse, to be displayed for the public. While the monument was being constructed, Eva’s embalmed body was displayed in her former office at the CGT Building for almost two years. Before the monument to Evita was completed, Juan Perón was overthrown as a result of a military coup, the Revolución Libertadora, in 1955. In 1955, Juan Perón hastily fled the country and was unable to make the arrangements to secure Evita’s body.
Following his flight, a military dictatorship took power, and the new authorities had removed Eva’s body from display, and its whereabouts were a mystery for 16 years. From 1955 to 1971, the military dictatorship of Argentina had issued a ban on Perónism. It also became illegal, not only to possess pictures of Juan and Eva Perón in one’s home, but to also speak their names. In 1971, the military had revealed that Eva’s body was buried in a crypt in Milan, in Italy, under the name: “Maria Maggi”. It had also appeared that her body had been damaged during its transport and storage, such as compressions to her face and disfigurement of one of her feet due to the body having been left in an upright position.
In 1995, Tomás Eloy Martínex had published Santa Evita, which was a fictionalised work that would propound many new stories about the escapades of the corpse. The allegations that her body was the object of inappropriate attention were derived from his description of an ’emotional necrophilia’ by embalmers, Coronel Koenig, and his assistant, Arancibia. Many of the primary and secondary references to his novel had inaccurately stated that her body had been defiled in some way, which resulted in the widespread belief in this myth. Also included were the allegations that many wax copies were made, that the corpse had been damaged with a hammer, and that one of the wax copies was the object of an officer’s sexual attentions.
Eva Duarte Perón’s Final Resting Place
In 1971, Eva Perón’s body was exhumed and was flown to Spain, where Juan Perón had maintained the corpse in his home. Juan and his third wife, Isabel, had decided to keep the corpse in their dining room, on a platform near the table, and in 1973, Juan Perón had come out of exile and had returned to Argentina, where he had become President for the third time. Juan Perón had died while in office in 1974, and his third wife, Isabel Perón, whom he had married on the 15th November 1961, and who had also been elected the Vice-President, had succeeded him. She had become the first female President in the Western Hemisphere, and Isabel had Eva Perón’s body returned to Argentina and (briefly) displayed her body beside her husband’s body. Perón’s body was later on buried in the Duarte family tomb in the La Recoleta Cemetery, in Buenos Aires.
The Argentinian Government had taken elaborate measures in order to make Perón’s tomb secret, and the tomb’s marble floor has a trapdoor that leads to a compartment containing two coffins. Under that compartment is a second trapdoor and also a second compartment. That is where Perón’s coffin rests, though the biographers, Nicholas Fraser and Marysa Navarro have written that the claim is often made that her tomb is so secure that it could withstand a nuclear attack. “It reflects a fear”, they wrote, “a fear that the body will disappear from the tomb and that the woman, or rather the myth of the woman, will reappear.”
Eva “Evita” Duarte Perón’s Legacy & Criticism – Argentina & Latin America, the Allegations of Fascism & International Popular Culture

“In all of Latin America, only one other woman has aroused an emotion, devotion and faith comparable to those awakened by the Virgin of Guadalupe. In many homes, the image of Evita is on the wall next to the Virgin.” — Fabienne Rousso Lenoir

In his essay, which was titled: “Latin America”, which was published in The Oxford Illustrated History of Christianity, John McManners had claimed that the appeal and success of Eva Perón were related to the Latin American mythology and concepts of divinity. McManners had also claimed that Eva Perón had consciously incorporated the aspects of the theology of the Virgin and of Mary Magdalene into her public persona. The Historian, Hubert Herring, has described Eva Perón as being “Perhaps the shrewdest woman yet to appear in public life in Latin America.”

In a 1996 interview, Tomás Eloy Martínez had referred to Eva Perón as: “the Cinderella of the tango and the Sleeping Beauty of Latin America.” He has also suggested that she has remained as an important cultural icon for the same reasons as the fellow Argentine, Che Guevara, by saying that:

“Latin American myths are more resistant than they seem to be. Not even the mass exodus of the Cuban raft people or the rapid decomposition and isolation of Fidel Castro’s regime have eroded the triumphal myth of Che Guevara, which remains alive in the dreams of thousands of young people in Latin America, Africa and Europe. Che as well as Evita symbolize certain naive, but effective, beliefs: the hope for a better world; a life sacrificed on the altar of the disinherited, the humiliated, the poor of the earth. They are myths which somehow reproduce the image of Christ.” – Tomás Eloy Martínez

Although it wasn’t a government holiday, the anniversary of Eva Perón’s death is marked by many Argentines each year, and additionally, Eva Perón has been featured on Argentine coins, and a form of an Argentine currency, called “Evitas” was named in her honour. Ciudad Evita (Evita City), which was established by the Eva Perón Foundation in 1947, is located just outside of Buenos Aires.

Cristina Kirchner, who was the first elected female President in Argentine history, is a Perónist who was occasionally referred to as “The New Evita.” Kirchner has said that she doesn’t want to compare herself to Evita, by claiming that she was a unique phenomenon in Argentine history. Kirchner has also said that the women of her generation, who had come of age in the 1970s, during the military dictatorships in Argentina, owe a debt to Evita for offering an example of passion and combativeness.

On the 26th July 2002, the 50th Anniversary of Eva Perón’s death, a museum was opened in her honour, which was called the Museo Evita, and the museum, which was created by her great-niece, Cristina Alvarez Rodriquez, houses many of Eva Perón’s clothes, portraits, as well as artistic renderings of her life, which has also become a popular tourist attraction. The museum was opened in a building that was once used by the Eva Perón Foundation.

In the book: “Eva Perón: The Myths of a Woman”, the cultural anthropologist, Julie M. Taylor, had claimed that Evita has remained important in Argentina due to the combination of three unique factors, by saying that:

“In the images examined, the three elements consistently linked—femininity, mystical or spirituality power, and revolutionary leadership—display an underlying common theme. Identification with any one of these elements puts a person or a group at the margins of established society and at the limits of institutional authority. Anyone who can identify with all three images lays an overwhelming and echoing claim to dominance through forces that recognize no control in society or its rules. Only a woman can embody all three elements of this power.” – Julie M. Taylor

Julie M. Taylor also argued that the fourth factor in Evita’s continued importance in Argentina related to her status as a dead woman, and the power that death would hold over the public’s imagination. She also suggested that Evita’s embalmed corpse is analogous to the incorruptibility of various Catholic saints, such as Bernadette Soubirous, and also has powerful symbolism within the largely Catholic cultures of Latin America, by also saying that:

“To some extent her continuing importance and popularity may be attributed not only to her power as a woman but also to the power of the dead. However, a society’s vision of the afterlife may be structured, death by its nature remains a mystery, and, until society formally allays the commotion it causes, a source of disturbance and disorder. Women and the dead— death and womanhood —stand in similar relation to structured social forms: outside public institutions, unlimited by official rules, and beyond formal categories. As a female corpse reiterating the symbolic themes of both woman and martyr, Eva Perón perhaps lays double claim to spiritual leadership.” – Julie M. Taylor

John Balfour was the British Ambassador in Argentina during the Perón regime, and described Evita’s popularity, by saying that:

“She was by any standard a very extraordinary woman; when you think of Argentina and indeed Latin America as a men dominated part of the world, there was this woman who was playing a very great role. And of course she aroused very different feelings in the people with whom she lived. The oligarchs, as she called the well-to-do and privileged people, hated her. They looked upon her as a ruthless woman. The masses of the people on the other hand worshipped her. They looked upon her as a lady bountiful who was dispensing Manna from heaven.” – John Balfour

In 2011, two giant murals of Evita were unveiled on the building facades of the current Ministry of Social Development, which is located on 9 de Julio Avenue. These works were painted by the Argentine artist, Alejandro Marmo, and on the 26th July 2012, to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of Evita’s death, the notes were issued in a value of 100 pesos.

The controversial effigy of Julio Argentino Roca was replaced by that of Eva Duarte Perón, which made her the first actual woman to be featured on the currency of Argentina. The image in the notes were based on a 1952 design, whose sketch was found in the Mint, was made by the engraver, Sergio Pilosio with the artist, Roger Pfund. The printing had totalled 20 million notes; it isn’t clear whether the government will replace the notes that feature Roca and the Desert Campaign.

The biographers, Nicholas Fraser and Marysa Navarro wrote that Juan Perón’s opponents had, from the start, accused Perón of being a fascist, though Spruille Braden, who was a diplomat from the United States, who was also greatly supported by Juan Perón’s opponents, campaigned against Juan Perón’s first candidacy on the platform that Juan Perón was a fascist and also a Nazi.

Fraser and Navarro had also theorised that the perception of the Perón’s as fascists was enhanced during Evita’s 1947 European tour, during which she was a guest of honour of Francisco Franco. By 1947, Franco became politically isolated as one of the few remaining fascists to retain power, and was therefore in desperate need of a political ally. With nearly a third of Argentina’s population of Spanish descent, it had seemed natural for Argentina to have diplomatic relations with Spain.

Commenting on the international perception of Evita during her 1947 European tour, Fraser and Navarro wrote that: “It was inevitable that Evita be viewed in a fascist context. Therefore, both Evita and Perón were seen to represent an ideology which had run its course in Europe, only to re-emerge in an exotic, theatrical, even farcical form in a faraway country.”

Laurence Levine, who was the former President of the U.S-Argentine Chamber of Commerce, wrote that in contrast to the Nazi ideology, the Perón’s were not anti-Semitic. In the book: “Inside Argentina from Perón to Menem: 1950-2000 from an American Point of View”, Laurence Levine wrote that:

“The American government demonstrated no knowledge of Perón’s deep admiration for Italy (and his distaste for Germany, whose culture he found too rigid). Nor did they appreciate that although anti-Semitism existed in Argentina, Perón’s own views and his political associations were not anti-Semitic. They paid no attention to the fact that Perón sought out the Jewish community in Argentina to assist in developing his policies and that one of his most important allies in organizing the industrial sector was José Ber Gelbard, a Jewish immigrant from Poland.” – Laurence Levine

The biographer, Robert D. Crassweller, wrote that: “”Peronism was not fascism”, and that “Peronism was not Nazism.” He also referred to the comments of the U.S Ambassador, George S. Messersmith, and while he visited Argentina in 1947, Messersmith had made the following statement: “There is not as much social discrimination against Jews here as there is right in New York or in most places at home.”

TIME Magazine had published an article that was made by Tomás Eloy Martínez—the Argentine writer, journalist, and the former director of the Latin American program at Rutgers University—which was titled: “The Woman Behind the Fantasy: Prostitute, Fascist, Profligate—Eva Peron Was Much Maligned, Mostly Unfairly”. In this article, Martínez wrote that the accusations that Eva Duarte Perón was a fascist, a Nazi, and a thief had been made against her for decades, and he also wrote that the allegations were untrue, by saying that:

“She was not a fascist—ignorant, perhaps, of what that ideology meant. And she was not greedy. Though she liked jewelry, furs and Dior dresses, she could own as many as she desired without the need to rob others…. In 1964 Jorge Luis Borges stated that ‘the mother of that woman [Evita]’ was ‘the madam of a whorehouse in Junín.’ He repeated the calumny so often that some still believe it or, more commonly, think Evita herself, whose lack of sex appeal is mentioned by all who knew her, apprenticed in that imaginary brothel. Around 1955 the pamphleteer Silvano Santander employed the same strategy to concoct letters in which Evita figures as an accomplice of the Nazis. It is true that (Juan) Perón facilitated the entrance of Nazi criminals to Argentina in 1947 and 1948, thereby hoping to acquire advanced technology developed by the Germans during the war. But Evita played no part.” – Tomás Eloy Martínez

In his 2002 doctoral dissertation at the Ohio State University, Lawrence D. Bell had written that the governments that had preceded Juan Perón had been anti-Semitic, but that his government wasn’t. Juan Perón had “eagerly and enthusiastically” attempted to recruit the Jewish community into his government and set up a branch of the Perónist Party for the Jewish members, known as the Organización Israelita Argentina (OIA).

Perón’s government was the first to court the Argentine Jewish community, and was also the first to appoint the Jewish citizens to public office. Kevin Passmore had written that the Perónist regime, more than any other in Latin America, was accused of being fascist. But he says that the Perónist regime was not being fascist, and what had passed for fascism under Perón never took hold in Latin America. Additionally, because of the fact the Perónist regime had allowed rival political parties to exist, it cannot be described as being totalitarian.

By the late 20th Century, Eva Perón had become the subject of numerous articles, books, stage plays and even musicals, which ranged also from the biography: “The Woman with the Whip” to a 1981 Television movie called Evita Perón with Faye Dunaway being in the title role. The most successful rendering of Eva Perón’s life was the musical production, Evita.

The musical had begun as a concept album, which was co-produced by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber in 1976, with Julie Covington being in the title role. Elaine Page was later on case in the title role when the concept album was adapted into a musical stage production in London’s West End and won the 1978 Olivier Award for Best Performance in a Musical for her performance as the title character in the Broadway production. Nicholas Fraser had claimed that to date: “the musical stage production has been performed on every continent except Antarctica and has generated over $2 billion in revenue.”

From as early as 1978, the musical was considered as the basis for a movie, and after almost 20 years of the film’s production being delayed, the Queen of Pop, Madonna, was cast as Eva Duarte Perón in the 1996 version of the film, Evita. As a result of the film, Madonna won the Golden Globe Award for “Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy.” In response to the American film, and in an alleged attempt to offer a more politically accurate depiction of Evita’s life, an Argentinian film company released the film, Eva Perón: The True Story. The Argentinian production had starred the actress, Esther Goris, in the title role. This movie was the 1996 Argentinian submission for the Oscar in the category of “Best Foreign Language Film.”

Nicholas Fraser wrote that Evita was the perfect popular culture icon for our times, because her career had foreshadowed, by the late 20th Century, what had become common. During Evita’s time, it was considered as being scandalous for a former entertainer to take part in public political life, though her detractors in Argentina had often accused her of turning public political life into a show business. However, Nicholas Fraser had claimed that the public had become engrossed in the cult of celebrity and that the public political life had become insignificant.

In this regard, Evita was perhaps ahead of her time, but Fraser had also written that Evita’s story appeals to our celebrity-obsessed age because her story confirmed one of Hollywood’s oldest clichés, the rags to riches story. By reflecting on Eva Perón’s popularity more than half a century after her death, Alma Guillermoprieto wrote that: “Evita’s life has evidently just begun.”

This Case Study on Eva Duarte Perón now comes to a remarkable close, and is the last offical standard article for 2015. Check back very soon for the final article, where I will take a full look-back on 2015, on this entire year in review.

Alex Smithson

Cecil Beaton - Historical Photographers

Historical Photographers: Cecil Beaton

Next in the Historical Photographers series is Cecil Beaton, who was a reknowned English fashion, portrait and war photographer, among many other hobbies that made him the photographer that he was. In this article, I will talk about Cecil Beaton, as well as the timeline of events that unfolded up until his death in 1980.

Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE (14th January 1904 – 18th January 1980)

Cecil Beaton was an English fashion, portrait and war photographer. He was also a diarist, a painter, an interior designer and an Academy Award-winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre. He was named in the International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame in 1970.

Cecil’s Early Life & Education

Cecil Beaton was born on the 14th January 1904 in Hampstead, and was the son of Ernest Walter Hardy Beaton (1867 – 1936), a prosperous timber merchant, and his wife, Etty Sissons (1872 – 1962). His grandfather, Walter Hardy Beaton (1841 – 1904), had founded the family business of Beaton Brothers Timber Merchants and Agents, and his father had followed into the business. Ernest Beaton was also an amateur actor, and had met his wife, Cecil’s mother, Esther or Etty, when he was playing the lead in a play. She was the daughter of a Cumbrian blacksmith named Joseph Sissons and had come to London to visit her married sister.

Through his maternal grandmother, Elizabeth Oldcorn, Cecil Beaton was related to the Blessed Father, Edward Oldcorne, who was involved in the Gunpowder Plot. Ernest and Etty Beaton had four children, and in addition to Cecil, there were two daughters; Nancy Elizabeth Louise Hardy Beaton (1909 – 1999, who had married Sir Hugh Smiley) and Barbara Jessica Hardy Beaton (1912 – 1973, known as Baba, and she married Alec Hambro), and another son, Reginald Ernest Hardy Beaton (1905 – 1933).

Cecil Beaton was educated at Heath Mount School (where he was bullied by Evelyn Waugh) and St Cyprian’s School, Eastbourne, where his artistic talent was quickly recognised, and both Cyril Connolly and Henry Longhurst had reported in their autobiographies that they were overwhelmed by the beauty of Beaton’s singing at the St Cyprian’s school concerts.

When Cecil was growing up, his nanny had a Kodak 3A Camera, which was mainly reknowned for being an ideal piece of equipment that he could learn on, and his nanny began to teach him the basics of photography, as well as developing film. He would often get his sisters and his mother to sit for him, and when he was sufficiently proficient, he would send the photos off to the London society magazines, and would often write under a pen name, as well as ‘recommending’ the work of Beaton.

Cecil Beaton had attended Harrow School, and then, despite the fact that he had little or no interest in academia, he moved on to St John’s College, Cambridge, and studied history, art and architecture. Beaton had continued his photography, and through his university contacts, he had managed to get a portrait that depicted the Duchess of Malfi, which was published in the top fashion magazine, Vogue. It was actually George “Dadie” Rylands – “a slightly out-of-focus snapshot of him as Webster’s Duchess of Malfi standing in the sub-aqueous light outside the men’s lavatory of the ADC Theatre at Cambridge.” Cecil Beaton left Cambridge without a degree in 1925.

Cecil Beaton’s Career

After he proved to be hopeless as an office employee in his father’s timber business, Cecil had spent “many lugubrious months” learning to be an office worker with a cement merchant in Holborn. This resulted only in ‘an orgy of photography at weekends’, so he decided to strike out on his own. Under the patronage of Osbert Sitwell, he had put on his first exhibition in the Cooling Gallery, in London. It did cause quite a stir.

By believing that he would meet with greater success on the other side of the Atlantic, Cecil Beaton had decided to leave for New York and had slowly built up a reputation there, and by the time he had left, he had “a contract with Condé Nast Publications to take photographs exclusively for them for several thousand pounds a year for several years to come.”

From 1930 to 1945, Cecil Beaton had leased Ashcombe House in Wiltshire, where he had entertained many notable figures, and in 1947, he had brought Reddish House, which was set in 2.5 acres of gardens, which was approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) to the east in Broad Chalke. Here, he would transform the interior by adding rooms on the eastern side, which would extend the parlour southwards, as well as introducing many new things. Greta Garbo was a visitor.

The upper floor was equipped for illegal cock-fighting at the beginning of the 20th Century, but Cecil had decided to use the cages as wardrobes to store the costumes from his set design of My Fair Lady. Cecil Beaton remained at the house until he passed away in 1980, and was also buried in the churchyard. In 1940, he had also brought a townhouse at No.8 Pelham Place in London.

Cecil’s Photography

Cecil Beaton had designed book jackets and costumes for charity matinees, and had also learned the professional craft of photograph at the studio of Paul Tanqueray, until Vogue had taken him on regularly in 1927. He had also set up his own studio, and one of his earliest clients, and later, best friends was Stephen Tennant; Beaton’s photographs of Tennant and his circle were considered some of the best representations of the Bright Young People of the twenties and thirties.

Cecil’s first camera was a Kodak 3A folding camera, and over the course of his career, he had employed both large format cameras, and smaller Rolleiflex cameras. Beaton was never known as a highly skilled technical photographer, but had instead focused on staging a compelling model or scene and looked for the perfect shutter-release moment.

He was a photographer for the British edition of Vogue in 1931, when George Hoyningen-Huene, the photographer for the French Vogue magazine, travelled to England with his new friend Horst. Horst himself would then begin to work for the French Vogue magazine in November of that year. The exchange and cross-pollination of ideas between this collegial circle of artists across the Channel and the Atlantic had given a rise to the look of style and sophistication for which the 1930s were known.

Cecil Beaton was best known for his fashion photographs and society portraits. He had worked as a staff photographer for Vanity Fair & Vogue, in addition to photographing celebrities in Hollywood. However, in 1938, he had inserted ‘some-tiny-but-still-legible anti-Semitic phrases (including the word ‘kike’) into American Vogue at the side of an illustration about New York society. The issue was recalled and reprinted at vast expense, and Beaton was fired.’

Humiliated by his sacking from the American Vogue Magazine, Cecil Beaton had returned to England, where the Queen had recommended him to the Ministry of Information. It was there that he had become one of Britain’s leading war photographers, and was best known for his images of the damage that was caused by the German blitz. With his career being restored by the war, Cecil’s style had sharpened and his range had broadened.

Cecil Beaton had often photographed the Royal Family for official publication. Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother was his favourite royal sitter, for instance, once, he pocketed her scented hankie as a keepsake from a highly successful shoot. Cecil Beaton had taken the famous wedding pictures of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor (wearing a haute couture ensemble by the noted American fashion designer, Mainbocher).

During World War II, Cecil Beaton was initially posted to the Ministry of Information and was given the task of recording images from the home front, and it was during this assignment that he had captured one of the most enduring images of the British suffering during the war, that of the 3-year-old Blitz victim, Eileen Dunne, who was recovering in hospital, whilst clutching her beloved teddy bear. When the enduring photograph was published, America hadn’t yet officially joined the war — but splashed across the press in the U.S., images, such as Beaton’s, had helped to push the Americans to put pressure on their government to help Britain in its hour of need.

Cecil Beaton had a major influence on a relationship with two other leading lights in British photography, that of Angus McBean and David Bailey. McBean was arguably one of the best portrait photographers of his era — in the second part of McBean’s career (post-war), his work was clearly heavily influenced by Cecil Beaton, though arguably, McBean was technically far more proficient in his execution. David Bailey was also enormously influenced by Cecil Beaton when they had both met whilst working for the British Vogue Magazine in the early 1960s, and his stark use of the square format images (6 x 6) bears the clear connections to Cecil Beaton’s own working patterns.

Cecil Beaton’s Stage & Film Designs

After the war had ended, Cecil Beaton had tackled the Broadway stage, in which he would design the sets, costumes, and also the lighting for a 1946 revival of Lady Windermere’s Fan, in which he had also acted.

His most lauded achievement for the stage were the costumes for Lerner and Loewe’s My Fair Lady (1956), which had led to two Lerner and Loewe film musicals, Gigi (1958) and again, My Fair Lady (the 1964 version), both of which had earned Cecil Beaton the Academy Award for Costume Design. He had also designed the period film costumes for the 1970 film, On a Clear Day You Can See Forever. His additional Broadway credits had included The Grass Harp (1952), The Chalk Garden (1955), Saratoga (1959), Tenderloin (1960) and Coco (1969). He was also the winner of four Tony Awards.

He had also designed the sets and costumes for a production of Puccini’s last Opera, Turandot, which was first used at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, and then at Covent Garden. He had also designed the academic dress of the University of East Anglia.

Cecil Beaton’s Diaries

Cecil Beaton was a published and well-known diarist, and in his lifetime, six volumes of his diaries were published, which spanned the years 1922-1974. Most recently, a number of Cecil’s unexpurgated diaries were published, and these differed immensely in places to his original publications. While he had feared libel suits in his own lifetime, it would have ben foolhardy for Cecil Beaton to have included some of his more frank and incisive observations. “In the published diaries, opinions are softened, celebrated figures are hailed as wonders and triumphs, whereas in the originals, Cecil can be as venomous as anyone I have ever read or heard in the most shocking of conversation”, writes Hugo Vickers.

Cecil’s Personal Life & Death

Cecil Beaton had various relationships with men who were often ‘much’ younger, and his last lover was the former Olympic swordsman, Kin Hoitsma. He had also had relationships with women, including the likes of actresses, such as Greta Garbo and Coral Browne, the dancer Adele Astaire, the Greek socialite, Madame Jean Ralli (Lilia), and the British socialite, Doris Castlerosse (1901 – 1942). The great love of his life was the art collector, Peter Watson, although they were never lovers.

He was made a Knight Bachelor in the 1972 New Year Honours.

Two years later, Cecil Beaton had suffered a stroke which had left him permanently paralysed on the right side of his body. Although he had learnt to write and draw with his left hand, as well as having cameras adapted, Cecil Beaton had become frustrated by the limitations that the stroke had put upon his work. As a result of his stroke, Cecil Beaton had become anxious about his financial securities for his old age and, in 1976, had entered into negotiations with Philippe Garner, the expert-in-charge of photographs at Sotheby’s.

On behalf of the auction house, Philippe Garner had acquired Cecil Beaton’s archive — excluding all of the portraits of the Royal Family, and the five decades of prints that were held by Vogue in London, Paris & New York. Philippe Garner, who had almost singlehandedly invented the photographic auction, had overseen the archive’s preservation and partial dispersal, so that Cecil’s only tangible assets, and what he considered his life’s work, would ensure him an annual income. The first of five auctions were held in 1977, with the last auction taking place in 1980.

By the end of the 1970s, Cecil Beaton’s health had faded, and on the 18th January 1980, he passed away at Reddish House, his home in Broad Chalke in Wiltshire, at the age of 76.

Cecil Beaton’s Honours, Awards & Medals

  • Tony Award for Best Costume Design for Quadrille (play) [1955]
  • CBE (1956)
  • Tony Award for Best Costume Design for My Fair Lady (1957)
  • Fellow of the Ancient Monuments Society (1957)
  • Academy Award for Costume Design for Gigi (1958)
  • Tony Award for Best Costume Design for Saratoga (1960)
  • Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur (1960)
  • Academy Award for Best Art Direction for My Fair Lady (1964)
  • Academy Award for Costume Design for My Fair Lady (1964)
  • Honorary Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain (1965)
  • Tony Award for Best Costume Design for Coco (musical) [1970]
  • Knighthood (1972)

Cecil’s Photographic Works

  • Sir William Walton (1926)
  • Stephen Tennant (1927)
  • Lady Diana Cooper (1928)
  • Charles James (designer) (1929)
  • Lillian Gish (1929)
  • Oliver Messel (1929)
  • Lord David Cecil (1930)
  • Lady Georgia Sitwell (1930)
  • Gary Cooper (1931)
  • Molly Fink (1926)
  • Pablo Picasso, (1933)
  • Marlene Dietrich (1935)
  • Salvador Dalí (1936)
  • Natalie Paley (1936)
  • Aldous Huxley (1936)
  • Daisy Fellowes (1937)
  • Helen of Greece and Denmark, Queen Mother of Romania (1937)
  • Queen Sita Devi of Kapurthala (1940)
  • Bomb Victim (Elienn Dunne) [1940]
  • Winston Churchill (1940)
  • Graham Sutherland (1940)
  • Charles de Gaulle (1941)
  • Walter Sickert (1942)
  • Maharani Gayatri Devi, Rajmata of Jaipur (1943)
  • John Pope-Hennessy (1945)
  • Isabel Jeans (1945)
  • Greta Garbo (1946)
  • Yul Brynner (1946)
  • Vivien Leigh (1947)
  • Marlon Brando (1947)
  • Bobby Henrey (1948)
  • Duchess of Windsor (1951)
  • Vita Sackville-West (1952)
  • C. Z. Guest (1952)
  • Graham Greene (1953)
  • Elizabeth II’s Coronation (1953)
  • Alexis von Rosenberg, Baron de Redé (1953)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1954)
  • Grace Kelly (1954)
  • Mona von Bismarck (1955)
  • Bernard Berenson (1955)
  • Joan Crawford (1956)
  • Mrs. Charles (Jayne Wrightsman) [1956]
  • Maria Callas (1956)
  • Dame Edith Sitwell (1956)
  • Colin Wilson (1956)
  • Marilyn Monroe (1956)
  • Leslie Caron (1957)
  • Dolores Guinness (1958)
  • Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon (1960)
  • Albert Finney (1961)
  • Cristóbal Balenciaga (1962)
  • Lee Radziwill (1962)
  • Karen Blixen (1962)
  • Rudolf Nureyev (1963)
  • Audrey Hepburn (1964)
  • Margot Fonteyn (1965)
  • Jacqueline Kennedy (1965)
  • Sheridan Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 5th Marquess of Dufferin and Ava (1965)
  • Jamie Wyeth (1966)
  • Georgia O’Keeffe (1966)
  • Andy Warhol (1967)
  • Twiggy (1967)
  • Mick Jagger (1968)
  • Katharine Hepburn (1969)
  • Barbra Streisand (1969)
  • Gloria Guinness (1970)
  • Hubert de Givenchy (1970)
  • Mae West (1970)
  • David Hockney (1970)
  • Jane Birkin (1971)
  • Marie-Hélène de Rothschild (1971)
  • Marisa Berenson as Luisa Casati (1971)
  • Jacqueline de Ribes (1971)
  • Pauline de Rothschild (1972)
  • Tina Chow (1973)
  • Gilbert & George (1974)
  • Inès de La Fressange (1978)
  • Paloma Picasso (1978)
  • Caroline of Monaco (1978)
  • Olimpia de Rothschild (1978)
  • Dayle Haddon (1979)

Cecil Beaton’s Bibliography

  • “The Book of Beauty” (1930)
  • “Cecil Beaton’s Scrapbook” (1937)
  • “Cecil Beaton’s New York” (1938)
  • My Royal Past (1939)
  • “Air of Glory” (1941)
  • “Winged Squadrons” (1942)
  • Indian Diary and Album (1945/46)
  • Ashcombe: The Story of a Fifteen-Year Lease (1949)
  • Photobiography (1951)
  • Persona Grata (1953)
  • The Glass of Fashion (1954)
  • My Bolivian Aunt: A Memoir (1971)
  • Chinese Diary and Album (1945)
  • Japanese (1959)
  • Ballet
  • Portrait of New York (1948)
  • Self-Portrait with Friends: The Selected Diaries of Cecil Beaton (1926–1974)
  • The Wandering Years; Diaries (1922–1939) [1961]
  • Cecil Beaton’s “The Years Between Diaries” (1939–44)
  • The Strenuous Years, Diaries (1948–55) [1973]
  • The Restless Years: Diaries (1955–63) [1976]
  • The Parting Years: Diaries (1963–74) [1978]
  • The Unexpurgated Beaton: The Cecil Beaton Diaries as He Wrote Them (1970–80)
  • Beaton in the Sixties: The Cecil Beaton Diaries as He Wrote Them (1965–69)
  • Cecil Beaton’s ‘My Fair Lady’ (Diary Excerpts and Costume Sketches) [1966]
  • The Face of the World: An International Scrapbook of People and Places.
  • I Take Great Pleasure
  • Quail in Aspic: The Life Story of Count Charles Korsetz

Exhibitions

Major exhibitions have been held at the National Portrait Gallery in London, in 1968, and in 2004. The first international exhibition in 30 years, and the first exhibition of his works to be held in Australia were held in Bendigo, in Victoria from the 10th December 2005 to the 26th March 2006. In October 2011, the BBC’s Antiques Roadshow had featured an oil portrait that was made by Cecil Beaton of the Rolling Stones Band member, Mick Jagger, whom he had met in the 1960s. The painting, which was originally sold at the Le Fevre Gallery 1966 was valued for insurance purposes at £30,000.

An exhibition that celebrated The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, which showed the portraits of Her Majesty by Cecil Beaton, was opened in October 2011 at the Laing Art Gallery in Newcastle.

Cecil Beaton: Theatre of War, which was held at the Imperial War Museum in London: a major retrospective of Cecil Beaton’s war photography, was held from the 6th September 2012 to the 1st January 2013.

Cecil Beaton at Home: Ashcombe & Reddish at The Salisbury Museum in Wiltshire, was held from the 23rd May to the 19th September 2014, and was a biographical retrospective that focused on Cecil Beaton’s two Wiltshire houses, which also brought together for the first time, many of his art works, as well as his possessions from both eras of his life. The exhibition had included a full-size reproduction of the murals, as well as a four-poster bed from the Circus Bedroom at Ashcombe, including a section of the drawing room at the Reddish House.

The second Historical Photographer study on Cecil Beaton comes to a remarkable close. Please feel free to feedback what you thought of the article.

Alex Smithson